Animal Sensibility and Inclusive Justice in the Age of Bernard Shaw

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UBC Press, Oct 25, 2011 - Nature - 336 pages
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In the late nineteenth century, a number of prominent reformers were influenced by what Edward Carpenter called “the larger socialism,” a philosophy that promised to completely transform society, including the place of animals within it.

 

To open a window on late Victorian ideas about animals, Rod Preece explores what he calls radical idealism and animal sensibility in the work of George Bernard Shaw, the acknowledged prophet of modernism and conscience of his age. Preece examines Shaw’s reformist thought -- particularly the notion of inclusive justice, which aimed to eliminate the suffering of both humans and animals -- in relation to that of fellow reformers such as Edward Carpenter, Annie Besant, and Henry Salt and the Humanitarian League.

 

This fascinating account of the characters and crusades that shaped Shaw’s philosophy sheds new light not only on modernist thought but also on an overlooked aspect of the history of the animal rights movement.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 The Long Life and Varied Interests of GBS
13
2 Animal Sensibilities in the Shavian Era
93
3 Inclusive Justice among Bernard Shaws Contemporaries
144
4 The Inclusivism of Bernard Shaw
212
5 Creative Evolution
247
6 Inclusive Justice
267
Notes
281
Selected Bibliography
312
Index
316
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About the author (2011)

Rod Preece is professor emeritus at Wilfrid Laurier University and is the author of a number of books, including Brute Souls, Happy Beasts, and Evolution and Sins of the Flesh.

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