Animal Spatial Cognition: Behavioural and Brain Approach

Front Cover
World Scientific, 1996 - Science - 259 pages
0 Reviews
The “Cognitive Map” (Tolman, 1948) is a key notion in spatial processing studies. It refers to high level spatial representations. Although widely used, this term remains ambiguous. The aim of this book is two-fold: (1) to examine the most noteworthy studies (in laboratory settings) which have contributed during the last five decades to a better understanding of animal spatial representations; (2) to provide some hints for future research.Spatial tests designed by psychologists are useful tools for understanding the brain substrates of spatial memory. Conversely, brain treatments allow us to analyse the complex psychological mechanisms underlying spatial orientation. Within this interdisciplinary context, it is extremely important to take stock of a notion used (and sometimes misused) in cognitive neurosciences.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Historical Background to the Studies of Animal Spatial
1
Exploration and Spatial Knowledge
23
The Traditional Paradigms
43
Shortcuts
75
Chapter 5 Psychological Models of Spatial Processing
89
The Vector Models and Landmark Use
90
Linking Places with a Minimal Cognitive Cost
94
DeadReckoning and PathIntegration
96
Anatomical Recall
136
The Effects of APC Lesions on Reactions to Spatial Novelty
139
The APC and Traditional Spatial Tasks
141
Concluding Remarks
144
The Spatial Function of the Prefrontal and Occipital Cortices
149
Neuroanatomical Recall
150
The Prefrontal Cortex and Traditional Learning Tasks
153
Anatomical Recall
159

Gallistels Model
99
Poucets Model
103
Concluding Remarks
107
The Hippocampal Formation and Spatial Processing
111
a Structure at the Crossroads of Brain Functional Networks
112
The Hippocampus and Traditional Spatial Learning Tasks
114
The Hippocampal Formation Exploration and ProblemSolving Tasks
118
Hippocampal Place Cells
124
Head Direction Cells
131
Concluding Remarks
132
an Interface between the Physical World and Representations?
135
Effects of Occipital Lesions in VisuoMotor Tests
160
Effects of Occipital Lesions on ReactiontoChange and Spatial Problem Solving Tests
161
The Occipital Cortex and Traditional Learning Tasks
163
Occipital Cortex as the Neural Substrate of Mental Imagery and Storage of Local Views
167
Concluding Remarks
169
Neurobiological models of spatial processing
171
Conclusions
201
References
219
Subject Index
253
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information