Animal, Vegetable, or Woman?: A Feminist Critique of Ethical Vegetarianism

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SUNY Press, Oct 12, 2000 - Cooking - 221 pages
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Kathryn Paxton George challenges the view held by noted philosophers Tom Regan and Peter Singer and ecofeminists Carol Adams and Deane Curtin who assume the Principle of Equality to argue that no one should eat meat or animal products. She shows how these renowned individuals also violate the Principle of Equality, because they place women, children, adolescents, the elderly, and many others in a subordinate position. She reviews the principal arguments of these major ethical thinkers, offers a detailed examination of the nutritional literature on vegetarianism, and shows how this inconsistency arises and why it recurs in every major argument for ethical vegetarianism. Included is her own view about what we should eat, which she calls feminist aesthetic semi-vegetarianism. "
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Ethical Vegetarianism and Traditional Moral Theory
19
Feminism and Ethical Vegetarianism
49
A Feminist Argument Against Ethical Vegetarianism
77
Bias Reasoning and Scientific Studies
117
Gender Equality and Interspecies Equality
131
Feminist Aesthetic Semivegetarianism
149
Notes
173
References
191
Index
213
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About the author (2000)

Kathryn Paxton George is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Idaho. She is the coeditor of two volumes: Agricultural Ethics: Issues for the Twenty-first Century (with Peter G. Hartel and James Vorst) and Readings in the Development of Moral Thought, Second Edition (with Marvin Henberg).

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