Sketches and Anecdotes of Animal Life

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Routhedge, 1855 - Animal behavior - 376 pages
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Page 25 - I walked up very near, and, as he was in the act of charging (being in those days under wrong impressions as to the impracticability of bringing down an elephant with a shot in the forehead), stood coolly in his path until he was within fifteen paces of me, and let drive at the hollow of his forehead, in the vain expectation that by so doing I should end his career. The shot only served to increase his fury — an effect which, I had remarked, shots in the head invariably produced ; and, continuing...
Page 168 - but how call you the sow when she is flayed, and drawn, and quartered, and hung up by the heels, like a traitor ? " " Pork," answered the swineherd. " I am very glad every fool knows that...
Page 132 - Both these varieties of rhinoceros attain an enormous size, being the animals next in magnitude to the elephant. They feed solely on grass, carry much fat, and their flesh is excellent, being preferable to beef. They are of a much milder and more inoffensive disposition than the black rhinoceros, rarely charging their pursuer. Their speed is very inferior to that of the other varieties, and a person well mounted can overtake and shoot them.
Page 157 - I could not guide her in the slightest, and she continued to splash, and plunge, and blow, and make her circular course, carrying me along with her as if I was a fly on her tail. Finding her tail gave me but a poor hold, as the only means of securing my prey, I took out my knife and cut two deep parallel incisions through the skin on her rump.
Page 142 - ... perfection of rifle practice, and after a few shots become exceedingly shy, exhibiting the snout only, and as instantly withdrawing it. The flesh is delicious, resembling pork in flavour, and abounding in fat, which in the colony is deservedly esteemed the greatest of delicacies. The hide is upwards of an inch and a half in thickness, and, being scarcely flexible, may be dragged from the ribs in strips like the planks from a ship's side.
Page 168 - Why, how call you those grunting brutes running about on their four legs?" demanded Wamba. " Swine, fool, swine," said the herd, " every fool knows that." "And swine is good Saxon," said the jester; "but how call you the sow when she is flayed, and drawn, and quartered, and hung up by the heels like a traitor?" "Pork," answered the swineherd. "I am very glad every fool knows that...
Page 131 - ... or long-horned white rhinoceros. Both varieties of the black rhinoceros are extremely fierce and dangerous, and rush headlong and unprovoked upon any object which attracts their attention. They never attain much fat, and their flesh is tough, and not much esteemed by the Bechuanas. " Their food consists almost entirely of the thorny branches of the wait-a-bit thorns. Their horns are much shorter than those of the other varieties, seldom exceeding eighteen inches in length. They are finely polished...
Page 201 - The skeleton measures, from the end of the nose to the tip of the tail, ten feet ten inches.
Page 191 - ... which seem to have no other object left in this wretched world than to become bacon; while others are thin, tiny, light-hearted, brisk, petulant piglings, with the world and all its loves and sorrows before them. Of their own accord, these creatures proceed down the street, to join the herdsman, who occasionally continues to repeat the sorrowful blast from his horn. " Gregarious, or naturally fond of society, with one curl in their tails, and with their noses almost touching the...
Page 132 - Both varieties of the black rhinoceros are much smaller and more active than the white, and are so swift that a horse with a rider on its back can rarely overtake them. The two varieties of the white rhinoceros are so similar in habits, that the description of one will serve for both, the principal difference consisting in the length and set of the anterior horn ; that of the...

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