Animation: Genre and Authorship

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Wallflower Press, 2002 - Performing Arts - 149 pages
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"Animation: Genre and Authorship" is an overview of the distinctive language of animation, its production processes, and the particular questions about who makes it, under what conditions and with what purpose. Arguably, animation provides the greatest opportunity for distinctive models of "auteurism" and revises generic categories. This is the first study to look specifically at these issues, and to challenge the prominence of live action movie-making as the first form of contemporary cinema and visual culture. Including extensive analysis of individual animators and their operation within studios such as Disney and Dreamworks, the book investigates the use of animation in genres from horror and science fiction to documentary and propaganda.
 

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Contents

what is animation?
1
the animation process
15
animation the modernist art
30
genre in animation
41
the animation auteur
72
appendix
113
glossary
136
notes
137
filmography
138
bibliography
147
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About the author (2002)

Paul Wells is head of the media portfolio at the University of Teesside, UK, with special interests in animation and broadcasting.

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