Animation Art: The Early Years, 1911-1953

Front Cover
Schiffer, 1995 - Antiques & Collectibles - 427 pages
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Animation art is among the most popular contemporary art forms. It captivates the imagination and awakens the child in us. With nearly 6800 pieces of animation art illustrated in this exciting book, most in color, Jeff Lotman covers the early period of animation, from the founding of the Winsor McKay Studio in 1911 to 1954 (a future volume will continue to the present). The art illustrated was offered at auction, which means that it is in the marketplace, an important fact for collectors. In addition to the 6,800 illustrated pieces, there is a listing of sales for several thousand additional pieces for which illustrations were unavailable. The book contains prices paid for the pieces at auction, making it a wonderful tool for assigning value. Mr. Lotman also shares his expansive knowledge of the art and the collecting. The animation process is explained in detail and important information for collectors is shared. This is easily the most comprehensive heavily illustrated view of animation art ever produced. It is a must have for every collector.

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Animation art: the early years, 1911-1953

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The Early Years is the first in a planned two-volume set from Lotman, a veteran international collector who saw a need some years ago for this type of price guide. It features over 6000 photographs of ... Read full review

Contents

Acknowledgments
4
Studios and Their Art
21
Additional Auction Results
397
Glossary of Terms
429
Copyright

About the author (1995)

Jeff Lotman began collecting animation art more than 15 years ago with only the knowledge he gained from a high school course in animation. He purchased his first piece of animation art of Bugs Bunny in Greenwich Village, New York. Currently, Jeff writes "On the Drawing Board," a regular column for In-Toon animation magazine. Jeff lives in Philadelphia.

Bibliographic information