Annals of Annapolis: Comprising Sundry Notices of that Old City from the Period of the First Settlements in Its Vicinity in the Year 1649, Until the War of 1812 : Together with Various Incidents in the History of Maryland, Derived from Early Records, Public Documents, and Other Sources ; with an Appendix, Containing a Number of Letters from General Washington, and Other Distinguished Persons, which Letters Have Never Been Published Before

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Cushing, 1841 - Annapolis (Md.) - 283 pages
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Page 213 - Having now finished the work assigned me, I retire from the great theatre of action ; and, bidding an affectionate farewell to this august body, under whose orders I have so long acted, I here offer my commission, and take my leave of all the employments of public life.
Page 214 - I consider it an indispensable duty to close this last act of my official life by commending the interests of our dearest country to the protection of Almighty God, and those who have the superintendence of them to his holy keeping.
Page 201 - You would have thought the very windows spake, So many greedy looks of young and old Through casements darted their desiring eyes Upon his visage ; and that all the walls With painted imagery had said at once " Jesu preserve thee ! welcome, Bolingbroke ! " Whilst he, from one side to the other turning, Bareheaded, lower than his proud steed's neck, Bespake them thus, — " I thank you, countrymen : " And thus still doing, thus he pass'd along.
Page 214 - Having defended the standard of liberty in this new world, having taught a lesson useful to those who inflict, and to those who feel oppression, you retire from the great theatre of action with the blessings of your fellow citizens ; but the glory of your virtues will not terminate with your military command, it will continue to animate remotest ages.
Page 213 - You have conducted the great military contest with wisdom and fortitude, invariably regarding the rights of the civil power through all disasters and changes.
Page 212 - ... who have been attached to my person during the War. It was impossible the choice of confidential Officers, to compose my family, should have been more fortunate. Permit me, sir, to recommend in particular, those who have continued in the service to the present moment, as worthy of the favourable notice and patronage of Congress.
Page 175 - That no man shall be taken or imprisoned, or disseized of his freehold, liberties, or privileges, or outlawed, or exiled, or in any manner destroyed, or deprived of his life, liberty, or property, but by the judgment of his peers or the law of the land.
Page 212 - MR. PRESIDENT, The great events on which my resignation depended, having at length taken place, I have now the honor of offering my sincere congratulations to Congress, and of presenting myself before them to surrender into their hands the trust committed to me, and to claim the indulgence of retiring from the service of my country.
Page 212 - Happy in the confirmation of our independence and sovereignty, and pleased with the opportunity afforded the United States of becoming a respectable nation, I resign with satisfaction the appointment I accepted with diffidence; a diffidence in my abilities to accomplish so arduous a task, which, however, was superseded by a confidence in the rectitude of our cause, the support of the supreme power of the Union and the patronage of Heaven.
Page 179 - States, in framing such further confederation between them, in making foreign alliances, and in adopting such other measures as shall be judged necessary for the preservation of their liberties : " Provided, the sole and exclusive right of regulating the internal polity and government of this colony be reserved to the people thereof.

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