Annotated Catalogue of the Principal Mineral Species Hitherto Recognized in California, and the Adjoining States and Territories: Being a Report to the California State Board of Agriculture

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author, 1866 - Mineralogy - 31 pages
 

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Page 19 - Count;/ there is an extensive region where oil and gas springs abound. The localities are numerous in the Counties of San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Tulare and Los Angeles.
Page 18 - A white milky variety of opal is found in Calaveras county, at Mokelumne Hill, or on the hill near that place, known as Stockton Hill, on the west side of Chile gulch. A shaft has been sunk there three hundred and forty-five feet, and the opals are found in a thin stratum of red gravel. They vary in size from a kernel of corn to the size of walnuts. Many of them contain dendritic infiltrations of manganese oxide, looking like moss.
Page 21 - In beautiful stellar ciystallizations on the crossing of the Little Truckee, Henness Pass road. The blades composing these aggregates are from half an inch to two inches in length, and from one eighth to one quarter of an inch in width.
Page 28 - ... believe that its extension is coincident with the great mountain chain of North America in its course around the globe, into and through Asia. After years of laborious search for fossils by which the age of the goldbearing rocks might be determined, I had the pleasure, early in 1863, to obtain a specimen containing Ammonites from a locality on the American river, preserved in the cabinet of Mr. Spear. This fossil was of extreme importance, being indicative of the secondary age of the gold-bearing...
Page 30 - ... metamorphosed. 17. Conglomerates and sandstones, heavy and massive; the so-called " greenstone " of Mount Bullion range. This is the general outline of the formations. Both of the bounding ranges of the valley are formed by the heavy metamorphic conglomerates, so much altered and changed as to be scarcely recognizable. They are generally supposed to be formed of greenstone, and in some places they do not give any evidence of their sedimentary origin; in others, the outlines of the pebbles and...
Page 24 - AND PRIVATE MINERALOGICAL AND GEOLOGICAL COLLECTIONS IN CALIFORNIA, KNOWN TO THE AUTHOR. I.— PUBLIC COLLECTIONS. STATE GEOLOGICAL COLLECTION — Sacramento and San Francisco; not arranged, and in part destroyed by fire in eighteen hundred and sixtyfive, at the Pacific Warehouse.
Page 28 - I had the pleasure, early in 1863, to obtain a enecimen containing Ammonites from a locality on the American river, preserved in the cabinet of Mr. Spear. This fossil was of extreme importance, being indicative of the secondary age of the gold bearing slates, and was therefore photographed, and copies of it sent to the Smithsonian Institution at Washington, for description. It was subsequently noticed in the proceedings of the California Academy of Natural Sciences, September, 1864.
Page 15 - Fork. Some of the dry arroyos or canons in that region are crowded with blocks of the pure ore, from one to two feet in diameter. It is broken from beds- and seams in an impure metamorphic limestone. The structure is granular, passing into micaceous, and freshly broken surfaces are extremely brilliant. Specimens of similar ore were brought in by Jules Marcou, in eighteen hundred and fiftythree, from the valley of Williams
Page 28 - Mariposa county, upon the chief goldbearing rocks of California, I identified a group of secondary fossils from the slates contiguous to the Pine Tree vein, and noticed them at a meeting of the California Academy, October 3, 1864, announcing the jurassic or cretaceous age of these slates. The best characterized fossil was a...
Page 23 - TETRAHEDRITE— (Gray Copper.) Mariposa County, with the gold in the Pine Tree vein ; also with the gold in the same or similar vein at the Crown lode, Emily Peak, and at Coultervillo in several claims.

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