Annual Report

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Page 148 - Report upon the Condition and Progress of the US National Museum during the year ending June 30, 1896.
Page 825 - Suckley (20, xii, pt. ii, 300) states that one of these snakes was brought to him alive at Ft. Snelling, Minn. When provoked it showed its irritation by vibrating the tip of its slender tail, which, when striking a crumpled leaf or any other small object, would produce a well-marked rattling noise, very similar to that made by the rattlesnake under the same circumstances. Other observers make mention of the same habit.
Page 881 - ... loral. Labials short and excessively high. Dorsal rows of scales 23, exterior alone smooth. A dorsal series of about 50 blotches, with four or five others on each side. Body beneath black. A narrow white line across the middle of the superciliarics ; a second behind the rostral.
Page 319 - Confederation do since do do do do do do do dn do do do do do do do do du do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do со do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do do d...
Page 841 - This species has the habit, common with many snakes, of vibrating its tail so as to make a rattling or whirring sound. This probably serves to warn the larger animals of its presence, so that they may avoid it. Dr. GB Goode includes this snake among those which are said to ' ' swallow " their young ; that is, when danger threatens they open their mouths, in order to allow the young to pass down the mother's throat for safety. More observations need to be made on this subject. I have been able to...
Page 545 - Several specimens were taken alive to the Leland Stanford Junior University, and kept for some months in a large glass jar in which some fine sand and pieces of wood and bark had been placed. At first, they ventured out from their retreat only at dusk unless disturbed, but after a few days they seemed to become more restless, and, urged perhaps by hunger, showed themselves many times each day. At night, when they were always more active, they often climbed to the top of a piece of yucca stem placed...
Page 545 - ... for a moment, during which they made no attempt to escape. They were not at all sluggish, however, and, if not caught immediately, made for the nearest cover as fast as their very short legs would permit. This cover was often the collector, and the little lizards either hid under his shoes, or climbed his legs, sometimes even reaching his shoulders. They showed no desire to enter the numerous holes in the ground about them, or to escape by burrowing. Put into a glass bottle they became very light...
Page 770 - H. simus. Eye small, its centre rather posterior to the middle of the imaginary line connecting the tip of rostral with the lower angle of the postlabial, which line scarcely crosses the eyeball. Orbital plates, 10—13 in number. Loral triangular, rather longer than high, separated from the frontal by...
Page 864 - ... yellowish brown, with three series of dorsal black blotches, 53 in number, from the head to opposite the anus, with 12 on the tail, in the shape of transverse bars. Those of the medial series the larger, and covering 8 or 9 rows of scales. On the anterior part of the body they are subcircular, embracing longitudinally four scales ; posteriorly they become shorter by one scale. The light spaces between are a little narrower than the blotches themselves for the twelve anterior blotches, and wider...
Page 876 - ... which indicates that generic characters originate independently of the specific. The transitions above noted are not, however, without mutual correlations. The characters are found so associated in such a great majority of the specimens as to indicate the existence of subspecies, whose definitions are given below ; exceptions to these are given under the head of each subspecies. I. No yellow band posteriorly from orbit (a yellow half collar). a. Dorsal spots or saddles (red) open at the sides,...

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