Annual Report of Major General Leonard Wood, U.S.V., Commanding Division of Cuba, Volume 1

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Popular passages

Page 96 - When these wires pass through roofs, floors, walls, or partitions, or where they cross or are liable to touch metallic masses, like iron girders or pipes, they should be thoroughly protected...
Page 97 - All joints must be mechanically and electrically perfect, to prevent heat being generated at these points. When soldering fluids are used in making joints,. the latter should be carefully washed and dried before insulation is applied. 12. Under all circumstances complete metallic circuits must be employed. Gas and water pipes must never form part of the circuit, as their joints are rarely electrically good, and therefore become a source of danger.
Page 97 - Overhead conductors, whether passing over or attached to buildings, must be insulated at their points of support. Precautions must be taken to obviate all risk of short-circuiting where they are likely to touch a building or other overhead conductors and wires, either by their own falling, or by being fallen upon by other conductors. 14.
Page 97 - Conductors which are protected on the outside by lead, or metallic armour of any kind, require the greatest care in fixing, on account of the large conducting surface which would become connected to the core in the event of metallic contact between them. 10.
Page 179 - The following order has been received from the War Department: WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 9, 1900.
Page xxviii - The total number of males over 21 years of age is 55,595, or 27.5 per cent of the total population of the province. This total number of potential voters is composed, first, of 21,320 whites born in Cuba, of whom all except 477 are Cuban citizens; second, 10,217 whites born in Spain, of whom only a trifling number were Cuban citizens; 1,016, or about 10 per cent, were Spanish citizens; 5,705, or more...

Bibliographic information