Annual Report of the Agricultural Experiment Station of the University of Minnesota, Issues 65-68

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 216 - ... if applied during the morning of a warm day, will dry in a few hours, and form a tenacious coating, not easily dissolved by rain.
Page 214 - ... from the approach of enemies at either end. Having thus perfected its arrangements, it again turns round so as to have its head upwards, when it rests from its labors in the interior of the passage until the following spring, when the mature larva sheds its skin and discloses the pupa.
Page 309 - The. mother ^beetle deposits her eggs singly in circular pits which she excavates in the gallery in two opposite series, parallel with the grain of the wood. The eggs are loosely packed in the pits with chips and material taken from the fungus bed which she has previously prepared in the vicinity and upon which the ambrosia has begun to grow. The young...
Page 230 - The life histories of these insects, as far as known, are curiously different in respect to the times and periods of development. The larva of Colaspis appears early in the season, and does its mischief principally in the months of April and May, the beetles appearing in June and July. That the eggs are laid by this beetle in the preceding year, is rendered highly probable, in which case the species hibernates in the egg. Paria, on the other hand, certainly passes the winter as an adult, doubtless...
Page 180 - Canada ; and, although seldom very abundant, rarely does a season pass without some of them being seen. During the day they are inactive, and may be found clinging to the under side of the leaves of trees, often drawing together two or three leaves and holding them with their sharp claws for the purpose of concealing themselves. At dusk they issue from their...
Page 290 - All fallen fruit should be picked up" is a rule that should be strictly followed in every orchard. If the owners of trees have no time for this purpose let them permit turkeys and chickens to do so; even hogs and sheep may be made useful. There are many other methods in vogue, and a few of them are of some use. Shingles laid close to the trunk of a tree to be protected will offer early in the spring a shelter for the beetles that have fed upon the trees during the night and...
Page 140 - June and July. It does not confine its attacks to the base of the tree, but affects the trunk more or less throughout, and sometimes the larger branches. "The eggs, which are yellow and irregularly ribbed, are very small, about one-fiftieth of an inch long, of an ovoidal form, flattened at one end, and are fastened by the female with a glutinous substance, usually under the loose scales or within the cracks and crevices of the bark ; sometimes singly, at other times several in a group. The young...
Page 310 - A portion of the excrement is evidently utilized to form the fungus garden bed. The mother beetle is constantly in attendance upon her young during the period of their development, and guards them with jealous care. "The mouth of each cradle is closed with a plug of the food fungus, and as fast as this is consumed it is renewed with fresh material.
Page 277 - Paris green should be applied at the rate of one pound to "one hundred and fifty gallons of water...
Page 310 - The Ambrosia of Monar thrum (Fig. 237), is moniliform, and resembles a mass of pearly beads. In its incipient stages a formative stem is seen which has short joints that become globular conidia and break apart. Short chains of cells, sometimes showing branches, may often be separated from the mass. The base of the fungus mass is stained with a tinge of green, but the stain in the wood is almost black.* "Two species, M.

Bibliographic information