Annual Report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution

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Page 126 - The property is bequeathed to the United States of America, "to found at Washington, under the name of the SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge among men.
Page 105 - I mean stock to remain in this country) to the United States of America, to found, at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge among men.
Page 114 - That, in proportion as suitable arrangements can be made for their reception, all objects of art and of foreign and curious research, and all objects of natural history, plants, and geological and mineralogical specimens belonging or hereafter to belong to the United States...
Page 128 - The emphasis upon publications as a means of diffusing knowledge was expressed by the first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. In his formal plan for the Institution, Joseph Henry articulated a program that included the following statement: "It is proposed to publish a series of reports, giving an account of the new discoveries in science, and of the changes made from year to year in all branches of knowledge not strictly professional.
Page 129 - ... of the report. 4. The reports to be published in separate parts, so that persons interested in a particular branch can procure the parts relating to it without purchasing the whole. 5. These reports may be presented to Congress for partial distribution, the remaining copies to be given to literary and scientific institutions, and sold to individuals for a moderate price. • The following are some of the subjects which may be embraced in the reports: I.
Page 26 - Institution," an establishment for the " increase and diffusion of knowledge among men." The Institution is legally an establishment, having as its members the President of the United States, the Vice President, the Chief Justice, and the President's Cabinet.
Page 148 - Solution of experimental problems, such as a new determination of the weight of the earth, of the velocity of electricity and of light ; chemical analyses of soils and plants ; collection and publication of scientific facts accumulated in the offices of Government; 4.
Page 114 - ... may be obtained for the museum of the institution, by exchanges of duplicate specimens belonging to the institution, (which they are hereby authorized to make,) or by donation, which they may- receive, or otherwise, cause such new specimens to be also appropriately classed and arranged.
Page 129 - Agriculture. 4. Application of science to arts. II. MORAL AND POLITICAL CLASS. 5. Ethnology, including particular history, comparative philology, antiquities, &c. 6. Statistics and political economy. 7. Mental and moral philosophy. 8. A survey of the political events of the world, penal reform, &c. III. LITERATURE AND THE FINE ARTS. 9. Modern literature. 10. The fine arts, and their application to the useful arts. 11. Bibliography. 12. Obituary notices of distinguished individuals.
Page 85 - That, so soon as the Board of Regents sh'all have selected the said site, they shall cause to be erected a suitable building, of plain and durable materials and structure, without unnecessary ornament, and of sufficient size, and with suitable rooms, or halls, for the reception and arrangement, upon a liberal scale, of objects of natural history, including a geological and mineralogical cabinet; also a chemical laboratory, a library, a gallery of art, and the necessary lecture rooms...

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