Annual Report - Missouri Botanical Garden, Volume 11

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Board of Trustees., 1900 - Botany
 

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Page 19 - Shaw have taken place in the course of the year: the preaching of a sermon " on the wisdom and goodness of God as shown in the growth of flowers, fruits, and other products of the vegetable kingdom...
Page 74 - ... investigation with respect to this point is to be regarded as but begun. When it becomes possible to grow the fungus found in the holes one may expect to reach more decisive conclusions. SUMMARY. In the foregoing, two forms of decay have been described, one destroying wood of Taxodium distichum, the other of Libocedrus decurrens. In both cases the wood is destroyed in localized areas, which are surrounded by apparently sound wood. The cell- walls are changed into compounds which diffuse through...
Page 58 - ... is due to the absence of bacteria ' ' caused doubtless by an actively antiseptic quality of the bog water." Trees and stumps have often been found in bogs perfectly preserved. Lyell (lc) speaks of tree-trunks dug out of Irish bogs and used for masts, also of white cedar logs in New England bogs.
Page 74 - ... Taxodium distichum, the other of Libocedrus decurrens. In both cases the wood is destroyed in localized areas, which are surrounded by apparently sound wood. The cell- walls are changed into compounds which diffuse through the walls and fill the cells surrounding the decayed center ; and these have been called humus compounds. In both, a fungus mycelium occurs with strongly marked characteristics, which flourishes within the diseased centers and grows between these centers without affecting the...
Page 54 - ... considerably. One may consider the distribution of the mycelium within the host. There are but few references to this point in discussions on fungi. Tubeuf * says: '• A large number of fungi have a mycelium which never extends beyond a very short distance round the point of first infection, and cause only local disease, frequently with no perceptible disturbing effect on the host. Such is the case with leaf spot diseases.
Page 20 - Card. 11: 103. 1899. TYPE LOCALITY: "In the Missouri River Valley, usually in open prairie or waste places, from Missouri to South Dakota and west to Colorado and Idaho, and extending into eastern Washington.
Page 1 - A revision of the American species of Euphorbia of the section Tithymalus occurring north of Mexico.
Page 145 - Revision of the species of Lophotocarpus of the United States; and description of a new species of Sagittaria.
Page 64 - ... it is probably one of the products effective in preventing the unlimited spread and destructive action of the disintegrating powers of that fungus.
Page 26 - ... to which the cypress is liable are few in number ; they affect it in the form of rot. That species of decay to which it is most liable, shows itself in partial and detached spots at greater or less distances, but often in very close proximity to each other. It is a decomposition of the woody fibre to which the tops and central parts are the most exposed, and which, when affected, appear as if operated upon by worms. This disease affects more or less, one-third of the cypress timber, irrespective...

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