Annual report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, Volume 19

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

CONTENTS Page
9
Myths of the Cherokee by James Mooney 3548
11
IIHistorical sketch of the Cherokee
14
The period of Spanish exploration1540?
23
The Colonial and Revolutionary period16541784
29
Relations with the United States
61
The Removal18381839
130
The Arkansas band18171838
135
The Texas band18171900
141
The Cherokee Nation of the West18401900
146
The East Cherokee18381900
157
IIINotes to the historical sketch
182
IVStories and storytellers
229
VThe myths
239
The first fire
240
Origin of corn and game
242
Origin of disease and medicine
250
Origin of death
252
How they brought back the Tobacco
254
The journey to the sunrise
255
The Moon and the Thunders
256
What the Stars are like
257
Origin of the Pleiades and the Pine
258
The milky way
259
Origin of fish and frogs
260
The Deluge
261
The Rabbit goes duck hunting
266
How the Rabbit stole the Otters coat
267
Why the Possums tail is bare
269
How the Terrapin beat the Rabbit
270
The Rabbit and the tar wolf
271
The Rabbit and the Possum after a wife
273
The Rabbit escapes from the wolves
274
How the Deer got his horns
275
Why the Deers teeth are blunt
276
What became of the Rabbit
277
VThe mythsContinued Quadruped mythsContinued Pz 31 The Terrapins escape from the wolves
278
The Groundhogs head
279
The migration of the animals
280
The ball game of the birds and animals
286
How the Turkey got his beard
287
Why the Turkey gobbles
288
How the Partridge got his whistle
289
The Pheasant dance
290
The Owl gets married
291
The Huhu gets married
292
Why the Buzzards head is bare
293
The Hunter and the Buzzard
294
The Iktena and the UhlnsiVtl
297
AganUnitsis search for the Uktena
298
The Red Man and the Uktena
300
The Hunter and the Uksuhl
301
The Hunter and the Tlanuwa
316
Nufiyunuwl the stone man
319
The Hunter in the Dflkwa
320
Atagahl the enchanted lake
321
The Bride from the south
322
The Hunter and Selu
323
The underground panthers
324
The Tsundigewl
325
The Bear Man
327
The Great Leech of Tlanusiyl
329
The Nufinghl and other spirit folk
330
The removed townhouses
335
VThe mythsContinued Wonder storiesContinued Pa8e 80 The spirit defenders of NlkwasI
336
Tsulkalu the slanteyed giant
337
Kanasta the lost settlement
341
Tsuwenahl a legend of Pilot knob
343
The man who married the Thunders sister
345
The haunted whirlpool
347
The water cannibals
349
Historical traditions
350
The Iroquois wars
351
Hiadeoni the Seneca
356
The two Mohawks
357
Escape of the Seneca boys
359
Hatcinondoiis escape from the Cherokee
362
Hempcarrier
364
The Seneca peacemakers
365
Ganas adventures among the Cherokee
367
The Shawano wars
370
The raid on TikwalitsT
374
The false warriors of Chilhowee
375
Cowee town
377
The eastern tribes
378
The southern and western tribes
382
The giants from the west
391
The massacre of the AniKutanl
392
The war medicine
393
Incidents of personal heroism
394
The old sacred things
395
Miscellaneous myths and legends
397
The two old men
399
The Mother Bears song
400
Baby song to please the children
401
Herberts spring
403
Local legends of North Carolina
404
Local legends of South Carolina
411
Local legends of Tennessee
412
Local legends of Georgia
415
Plant lore
420
VINotes and parallels
428
VIIGlossary
506
Index to Part 1 549576
549

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 475 - On Lough Neagh's bank as the fisherman strays, When the clear, cold eve's declining, He sees the round towers of other days, In the wave beneath him shining! Thus shall memory often, in dreams sublime, Catch a glimpse of the days that are over, Thus, sighing, look through the waves of time For the long-faded glories they cover!
Page 446 - I was present at the delivery of this curious invective ; when the hunter had despatched the bear, I asked him how he thought that poor animal could understand what he said to it ?
Page 138 - Agency ; and to each person, or head of a family, if he take along with him four persons, shall be paid immediately on his arriving at the Agency and reporting himself and his family, or followers, as emigrants and permanent settlers, in addition to the above, provided he and they shall have emigrated from within the Chartered limits of the...
Page 176 - The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians", with all the rights, franchises, privileges, and powers incident and belonging to corporations under the laws of the State of North Carolina. SEC. 2. That "The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians...
Page 122 - Cherokee nation the right by their national councils, to make and carry into effect all such laws as they may deem necessary for the government and protection of the persons and property within their own country belonging to their people, or such persons as have connected themselves with them...
Page 128 - I fought through the civil war and have seen men shot to pieces and slaughtered by thousands, but the Cherokee removal was the crudest work I ever knew.
Page 444 - I endeavored to persuade my benefactor and friendly adviser that she no longer had any life, and assured him that I was under no apprehension from her displeasure ; but the first proposition obtained no credit, and the second gave but little satisfaction. At length, the feast being ready, Wawatam...
Page 137 - West, a permanent home, and which shall, under the most solemn guarantee of the United States, be and remain theirs forever — a home that shall never, in all future time, be embarrassed by having extended around it the lines or placed over it the jurisdiction of a territory or state, nor be pressed upon by the extension in any way of any of the limits of any existing territory or state...
Page 19 - But on whatever occasion they may have been made, they are of considerable notoriety among the Indians : for a party passing, about thirty years ago, through the part of the country where this barrow is, went through the woods directly to it, without any instructions or inquiry ; and having staid about it some time, with expressions which were construed to be those of sorrow, they returned to the high road, which they had left about half a dozen miles to pay this visit, and pursued their journey.
Page 88 - The enemy retreated firing, until they got around, and in their buildings, where they made all the resistance that an overpowered soldier could do. They fought as long as one existed ; but their destruction was very soon completed. Our men rushed up to the doors of the houses, and in a few minutes killed the last warrior of them. The enemy fought with savage fury, and met death with all its horrors, without shrinking or complaining: not one asked to be spared, but fought as long as they could stand...

Bibliographic information