Annual Report of the Chief of the Division of Naturalization to the Commissioner-General of Immigration

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1911 - Naturalization
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Page 25 - States since that date there shall, be attached a certificate from the Department of Commerce and Labor stating the date, place, and manner of his arrival.
Page 1 - Annual Report of the Commissioner General of Immigration for the Fiscal Year ended June 30, 1914.
Page 19 - OF EXAMINATION. In the declaration of Intention of this petitioner he states that he arrived In this country at the port of New York on July 8, 1907, while In his petition he claims to have arrived at the port of Boston, Mass., on November 4,1903. Further attention Is directed to the fact that his wife and three children now reside at Bremen, Germany, one of the children, Gustav, having, It appears, been born In Bremen, Germany, on June 10, 1907. As stated above the alien claims to have arrived In...
Page 28 - And provided further, That the requirements of this section shall not apply to any alien who has prior to the passage of this Act declared his intention to become a citizen of the United States...
Page 9 - Besides the work of hearing petitions, the courts have disposed of certain certificates of naturalization under the provisions of section 15 of the act of June 26, 1906, which had been illegally procured, as follows : PROCEEDINGS UNDER SECTION 15. PROSECUTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE NATURALIZATION LAWS. Fines amounting to $3,338 were levied and collected in the following courts: United States district court, Indianapolis, Ind $200. 00 United States district court, Trenton, N . J 250.
Page 3 - ... functions because of lack of clerical force; at the same time pointing out very appropriately that it was a good deal better than self-sustaining from the financial point of view. Commissioner Campbell, in his annual report to the Secretary of Labor, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1911, said: At all times the clerical force has been insufficient, even with the aid of temporary assignments from other offices of the Department, to keep up with current work. This has resulted in large undisposed...
Page 17 - ... petition in a particular case or that the specific reason or reasons they nave discovered for recommending the dismissal of a petition is sufficient. Such a scheme, or arrangement, for work, with such a few men, takes no account of the human side of the agency employed. It can not. There is the workwhich is to be done and there is the amount which is allowed to be expended for the purpose. That branch of the Government which imposes the duties also provides the amount it deems sufficient to pay...
Page 17 - Duuith, under the St. Paul office. As it is shown to be practicable, examiners will be detached from the offices of the chief examiners and will be located at other points, so as to save the expense and loss of time occasioned by travel for long distances. Delay in carrying out this policy is occasioned by the lack of sufficient men to handle the business at the headquarters of the chief examiners. One of the most exacting duties of the examiners is that of calling upon the clerks of courts to give...
Page 4 - ... examinations made in the Division. That the Government has not had time to prepare itself is no answer to a petitioner's demand for judicial action upon his case when he appears before the court with his witnesses on the date set. The Government has undertaken to be prepared, and it must at all hazards be ready at the appointed time, or the court, unless a defect be disclosed, will, upon prima facie case, admit the petitioner with that same absence of actual knowledge which prevailed among the...
Page 5 - Total 43,678 46,987 64,316 impose upon them the necessity of filing new declarations of intention and waiting two years thereafter. That the supply of additional assistants to clerks of courts has had little effect on the general result, and has therefore had no appreciable effect upon the growth of business, will appear from a consideration of the data below: CASES DISPOSED OP BY COURTS IN CERTAIN STATES, 1910 AND 1911. Practically all of the clerical aid supplied to the clerks of courts was in...

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