Annual Report of the Commissioner of Navigation to the Secretary of Commerce and Labor

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1912 - Shipping
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Page 78 - An Act to provide revenue, equalize duties, and encourage the industries of the United States, and for other purposes.
Page 20 - From experience, however, it was found long ago that it would be beneficial to commerce if the local government would abstain from interfering with the internal discipline of the ship, and the general regulation of the rights and duties of the officers and crew towards the vessel or among themselves. And so by comity it came to be generally understood among civilized nations that all matters of discipline and all things done on board which affected only the vessel or those belonging to her, and did...
Page 20 - ... be left by the local government to be dealt with by the authorities of the nation to which the vessel belonged as the laws of that nation or the interests of its commerce should require. But if crimes are committed on board of a character to disturb the peace and tranquillity of the country to which the vessel has been brought, the offenders have never by comity or usage been entitled to any exemption from the operation of the local laws for their punishment, if the local tribunals see fit to...
Page 20 - It is part of the law of civilized nations that when a merchant vessel of one country enters the ports of another for the purpose of trade, it subjects itself to the law of the place to which it goes, unless by treaty or otherwise the two countries have come to some different understanding or agreement...
Page 78 - That a tonnage duty of two cents per ton, not to exceed in the aggregate ten cents per ton in any one year, is hereby imposed at each entry on all vessels which shall be entered in any port of the United States from any foreign port or place in North America, Central America, the West India Islands, the Bahama Islands, the Bermuda Islands, or the coast of South America bordering on the Caribbean Sea, or Newfoundland, and a duty of six cents per ton, not to exceed...
Page 78 - ... any port of the United States from any foreign port or place in North America, Central America, the West India Islands, the Bahama Islands, the Bermuda Islands, or the coast of South America Iwrdering on the Caribbean Sea, or the Sandwich Islands, or Newfoundland...
Page 236 - ... the enrolling or licensing of vessels, built in the United States and owned by citizens thereof, not propelled by sail or by internal motive power of their own, and not in any case carrying passengers, whether navigating the internal waters of a State or the navigable waters of the United States...
Page 20 - When private individuals of one nation spread themselves through another as business or caprice may direct, mingling indiscriminately with the inhabitants of that other, or when merchant vessels enter for the purposes of trade, it would be obviously inconvenient and dangerous to society, and would subject the laws to continual infraction, and the government to degradation, if such individuals or merchants did not owe temporary and local allegiance, and were not amenable to the jurisdiction of the...
Page 20 - And so by comity it came to be generally understood among civilized nations that all matters of discipline and all things done on board which affected only the vessel or those belonging to her, and did not involve the peace or dignity of the country, or the tranquillity of the port, should be left by the local government to be dealt with by the authorities of the nation to which the vessel belonged as the laws of that nation or the interests of its commerce should require.
Page 78 - Vessels entering otherwise than b; sea from a foreign port at which tonnage or lighthouse dues or other equivalent tax or taxes are not Imposed on vessels of the United States shall be exempt from the tonnage duty of 2 cents per ton, not to exceed in the aggregate 10 cents per ton in any one year.

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