Annual Report on the Vital Statistics of Massachusetts: Births, Marriages, Divorces and Deaths..., Volume 11

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State Printers, 1853 - Massachusetts
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Page vii - Report to the Legislature of Massachusetts, relating to the Registry and Returns of Births, Marriages, and Deaths, in the Commonwealth, for the Year ending Dec.
Page 91 - ... less than it has been, without including the increase consequent upon additions of territory. The aggregate increase of population, from all sources, shows a relative advance greater than that of any other decennial term, except that from the second to the third census, during which time the country received an accession of inhabitants, by the purchase of Louisiana, considerably greater than 1 per cent, of the whole number. Rejecting from the census of 1810 1.45 per cent., for the population...
Page 93 - In 1850, it was 5.26 to 1, and the ratio in favor of the former race is increasing. Had the blacks increased as fast as the whites during these sixty years, their number, on the first June, would have been 4,657,239 ; so that, in comparison with the whites, they have lost, in this period, 1,035,340.
Page 91 - Since ascertained to be 11,381. from 1840 to 1850, 35.12 per cent. But, without going behind the sum of the returns, it appears that the increase from the second to the third census was thirty-two liuiidredths of one per cent, greater than the increase from the sixth to the seventh.
Page 91 - The decennial increase of the most favored portions of Europe is less than 1} per cent, per annum, while with the United States it is at the rate of 3J per cent. According to our past progress, viewed in connection with that of European nations, the population of the United States in forty years will exceed that of England, France, Spain, Portugal Sweden, and Switzerland, combined.
Page 92 - The Census had been taken previously to 1830 on the 1st of August; the enumeration began that year on the 1st of June, two months earlier, so that the interval between the Fourth and Fifth Censuses was two months less than ten years, which time allowed for would bring the total increase up to the rate of 34.36 per cent. The table given below shows the increase from 1790 to 1850, without reference to intervening periods : Classes.
Page 111 - The period of life in which the mortality was the greatest, has been during the first year of existence, in which 3,750 infants have deceased. The number of deaths which have occurred under the age of five years was 6,914, being more than one-third of the whole number of deaths of the year. Five centenarians have departed during the past year. Four of these were females; one of whom was a resident in Great...
Page 100 - To 100,000 males at home, in 1851, the females were 105,012 ; or there were 20 males at home to 21 females. Of the children born alive in England and Wales during the 13 years 1839-51, 3,634,235 were males, and 3,465,629 females ; consequently 104,865 boys were born to every 100,000 girls born ; while to every 100,000 females living, there were 96,741 males living. How much the change in the proportions, and the subsequent disparity of the numbers in the two sexes, is due to emigration, or to a difference...
Page 135 - Tables for four years, which have been prepared with reference to this disease, many interesting facts may be deduced. During this period, the whole number of deaths have been set down as amounting to 15,270, or about one in every 65 of the population, taking the census of 1850 as the guide, and 470 to every 1,000 of' the whole number of deaths produced by specified diseases.
Page 100 - American parents, 35,514 of foreign parents, and 11,169 of parents whose places of nativity were not ascertained; being 58.29 per cent, for American, 31.73 per cent, for foreign, and 9.98 per cent, for those of unknown parentage. A glance at the same Table shows the relative percentage of the American and foreign births in the several counties, and also the percentage for each kind of birth in each county, compared with th$ aggregate number of births throughout the State.

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