Another City, Not My Own

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Thorndike Press, Nov 1, 1997 - Fiction
4 Reviews
Told from the point of view of one of Dunne's most familiar fictional characters - Gus Bailey - "Another City, Not My Own" tells how Gus, the movers and shakers of Los Angeles, and the city itself are drawn into the vortex of the O.J. Simpson trial. We have met Gus Bailey in previous novels by Dominick Dunne. He is a writer and journalist, father of a murdered child, and chronicler of justice - served or denied - as it relates to the rich and famous. Now back in Los Angeles, a city that once adored him and later shunned him, Gus is caught up in what soon becomes a national obsession. Using real names and places, Dunne interweaves the story of the trial with the personal trials Gus endures as he faces his own mortality.

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User Review  - dbsovereign - LibraryThing

I was in Thailand while the OJ trial was THE only story out of the United States at the time - this book gets to the root of why we were all fascinated by it all. Read full review

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User Review  - TerriBooks - LibraryThing

You know how a pointellist painting makes a whole picture out of separate colored specks ? This book was like that. individual paragraphs, slices of conversation, reactions and responses almost in ... Read full review

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About the author (1997)

Dominick Dunne was born in Hartford, Connecticut on October 29, 1925. He served in World War II and was awarded the Bronze Star for rescuing a wounded soldier at the Battle of the Bulge. After receiving a bachelor's degree from Williams College in 1949, he worked as a stage manager for the Howdy Doody Show and Robert Montgomery Presents. He then directed Playhouse 90 and was an executive producer of the ABC drama Adventures in Paradise. He started producing films in 1970 including The Boys in the Band, The Panic in Needle Park, Play It as It Lays, and Ash Wednesday. His addiction to alcohol and drugs eventually lead to the end of his career as a television and film producer. He beat his addictions and decided to become writer. He wrote several memoirs including The Way We Lived Then: Recollections of a Well-Known Name Dropper and novels including An Inconvenient Woman, A Season in Purgatory, The Two Mrs. Grenvilles, and Too Much Money. In 1982, his daughter was strangled by her boyfriend. Dunne kept a journal during the trial, which eventually became the Vanity Fair article Justice: A Father's Account of the Trial of His Daughter's Killer. After that, he wrote regularly for Vanity Fair and covered famous trials such as those of Claus von Bulow, O.J. Simpson, and the Menendez brothers. He also wrote a column entitled Dominick Dunne's Diary and hosted the television series Dominick Dunne's Power, Privilege, and Justice on CourtTV. He died from bladder cancer on August 26, 2009 at the age of 83.

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