Anselm on Freedom

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OUP Oxford, Jun 19, 2008 - Philosophy - 240 pages
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Can human beings be free and responsible if there is a God? Anselm of Canterbury, the first Christian philosopher to propose that human beings have a really robust free will, offers viable answers to questions which have plagued religious people for at least two thousand years: If divine grace cannot be merited and is necessary to save fallen humanity, how can there be any decisive role for individual free choice to play? If God knows today what you are going to choose tomorrow, then when tomorrow comes you have to choose what God foreknew, so how can your choice be free? If human beings must have the option to choose between good and evil in order to be morally responsible, must God be able to choose evil? Anselm answers these questions with a sophisticated theory of free will which defends both human freedom and the sovereignty and goodness of God.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Anselms Classical Theism
16
2 The Augustinian Legacy
30
3 The Purpose Definition and Structure of Free Choice
55
4 Alternative Possibilities and Primary Agency
73
5 The Causes of Sin and the Intelligibility Problem
87
6 Creaturely Freedom and God as Creator Omnium
108
7 Grace and Free Will
125
Part I The Problem and Historical Background
146
Part II Anselms Solution
169
10 The Freedom of God
185
Bibliography
206
Index
213
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About the author (2008)

Katherin Rogers is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Delaware, specializing in Medieval Philosophy and Philosophy of Religion.

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