Answering Questions With Statistics

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SAGE, Oct 20, 2011 - Social Science - 429 pages
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"The book is divided into three Parts: Part One has chapters that introduce data analysis and SPSS; Part Two contains eight chapters on descriptive statistics that begin with frequency tables and go through multiple regression; and Part Three includes six chapters on inferential statistics. Part One: Getting Started begins by answering some questions most students have right at the start questions like why study data analysis and how much math and computer knowledge is required? Essential concepts from research methods relevant for data analysis are also explained. Part Two: Descriptive Statistics: Answering Questions about Your Data demonstrates procedures to use when the analyst is only concerned with describing the cases for which he or she actually has data. Statistics summarizing single variables (univariate statistics) are presented first and then statistics summarizing relationships between variables (multivariate statistics). Frequency tables, measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, crosstabs, measures of association, subgroup means, and regression are all covered as are bar charts, pie charts, histograms, and clustered bar charts. Part Three: Inferential Statistics: Answering Questions about Populations explains procedures which allow the analyst to draw conclusions about the population from which his or her sample of cases was randomly selected. It begins with a simple chapter on the statistical theory behind inferential statistics. A four-step approach to hypothesis testing is introduced in the next chapter and demonstrated with one-sample t test hypotheses. The remaining chapters present different types of hypothesis tests including paired-samples, independent-samples, one and two-way ANOVA, and chi-square"--Provided by publisher.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction
3
Chapter 2 Data Sets
27
Answering Questions About Your Data
63
Chapter 3 Frequency Tables and Univariate Charts
67
Chapter 4 Central Tendency and Dispersion
95
Chapter 5 Creating New Variables
129
Chapter 6 Comparing Group Means
159
Chapter 7 Crosstab Tables
175
Answering Questions About Populations
261
Chapter 11 Sampling Distributions and Normal Distributions
265
Chapter 12 Hypothesis Testing and OneSample t Tests
291
Chapter 13 Paired and Independent Samples t Tests
315
Chapter 14 Analysis of Variance
339
Chapter 15 ChiSquare
367
Chapter 16 Hypothesis Testing With Measures of Association and Regression
389
Glossary
405

Chapter 8 Nominal and Ordinal Measures of Association
195
Chapter 9 Pearsons Correlation and Bivariate Regression
217
Chapter 10 Multiple Regression
241

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About the author (2011)

Robert Szafran" is Regents Professor of Sociology in the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis at Stephen F. Austin State University in Texas. A passionate believer in the ability of all college students to master and enjoy basic statistical analysis, he teaches courses in research methods and data analysis and also demography and labor force analysis. He has received both College and University Excellence in Teaching Awards. Past director of his university s First-Year Seminar Program and its Inter-disciplinary Linked Courses Program, he has also served as department chair. He received his PhD in Sociology at The University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Robert Szafran is Regents Professor of Sociology in the Department of Social and Cultural Analysis at Stephen F. Austin State University in Texas. A passionate believer in the ability of all college students to master and enjoy basic statistical analysis, he teaches courses in research methods and data analysis and also demography and labor force analysis. He has received both College and University Excellence in Teaching Awards. Past director of his university’s First-Year Seminar Program and its Inter-disciplinary Linked Courses Program, he has also served as department chair. He received his PhD in Sociology at The University of Wisconsin at Madison.

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