Antarctica: A Biography

Front Cover
OUP Oxford, Jan 24, 2013 - History - 646 pages
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For centuries it was suspected that there must be an undiscovered continent in the southern hemisphere. But explorers failed to find one. On his second voyage to the Pacific, Captain Cook sailed further south than any of his rivals but still failed to sight land. It was not until 1820 that the continent's frozen coast was finally sighted. Territorial rivalry intensified in the 1840s when British, American, and French expeditions sailed south to chart further portions of the continent that had come to be called Antarctica. For the nearly two centuries since, the race to claim exclusive possession of Antarctica has gripped the imagination of the world. Antarctica: A Biography is the first ever major international history of this forbidding continent - from the eighteenth century voyages of discovery to the fierce rivalries of today, as governments, scientists, environmentalists, and oil companies compete for control. On one level it is the story of explorers battling the elements in the most hostile place on earth as they strive for personal triumph, commercial gain, and national glory. On a deeper level, it is the story of nations seeking to incorporate the Antarctic into their own national stories - and to claim its frozen wastes as their own.
 

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Antarctica: A Biography

User Review  - Margaret Atwater-Singer - Book Verdict

When was the last time you read a biography of a continent? Day (research associate, La Trobe Univ.; Conquest: How Societies Overwhelm Others) gives readers the opportunity with his dense and thorough ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter 1 1770s
1
Chapter 2 17801820
17
Chapter 3 18211838
38
Chapter 4 18391843
61
Chapter 5 18431895
83
Chapter 6 18951906
98
Chapter 7 19071912
125
Chapter 8 19121918
151
Chapter 14 19371938
310
Chapter 15 19391941
331
Chapter 16 19411945
357
Chapter 17 19451947
381
Chapter 18 19481951
408
Chapter 19 19521956
434
Chapter 20 19571960
464
Chapter 21 19612012
492

Chapter 9 19191926
179
Chapter 10 19261928
203
Chapter 11 19291930
227
Chapter 12 19311933
253
Chapter 13 19341936
279
Epilogue
521
Endnotes
524
Select Bibliography
587
Index
594
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

David Day was a research fellow at Clare College, Cambridge, and Professor of Australian History at University College Dublin before taking up a Senior Research Fellowship at La Trobe University in Melbourne, where he is currently an Honorary Associate in the History Program. His many books include best-selling histories of the Second World War, biographies of Australian prime ministers, and a study of Winston Churchill and Robert Menzies that has been made into a television documentary. His books have won or been short-listed for several literary prizes, with his history of Australia, Claiming a Continent, winning the prestigious non-fiction prize at the Adelaide Festival. His last book, Conquest: How Societies Overwhelm Others (2008, also published by Oxford University Press), appeared to acclaim in Australia, Britain, and the United States, and has been translated into several languages.