Anti-Intellectualism in American Life

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 1963 - Social Science - 464 pages
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Winner of the 1964 Pulitzer Prize in Nonfiction

Anti-Intellectualism in American Life is a book which throws light on many features of the American character. Its concern is not merely to portray the scorners of intellect in American life, but to say something about what the intellectual is, and can be, as a force in a democratic society.

"As Mr. Hofstadter unfolds the fascinating story, it is no crude battle of eggheads and fatheads. It is a rich, complex, shifting picture of the life of the mind in a society dominated by the ideal of practical success." —Robert Peel in the Christian Science Monitor 

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User Review  - arosoff - LibraryThing

After 50 years, Richard Hofstadter’s analysis of anti-intellectualism in America is not just a historical curiosity; it’s a vital work that continues to inform modern thought and policy. When we see ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - encephalical - LibraryThing

The most interesting parts were in the historical observations. The fifth part on anti-intellectualism in education, particularly concerning the state of secondary education seemed irrelevant; at ... Read full review

Contents

Antiintellectualism in Our Time
3
On the Unpopularity of Intellect
24
THE RELIGION OF THE HEART
53
Copyright

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About the author (1963)

Born in 1916, Richard Hofstadter was one of the leading American historians and public intellectuals of the 20th century. His works include The Age of ReformAnti-intellectualism in American LifeSocial Darwinism in American Thought, 1860-1915The American Political Tradition, and others. He was the DeWitt Clinton Professor of American History at Columbia University. He died in 1970.

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