Anticapitalism and Culture: Radical Theory and Popular Politics

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Berg, Oct 15, 2008 - Social Science - 261 pages
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What does 'anticapitalism' really mean for the politics and culture of the twenty-first century?

Anticapitalism is an idea which, despite going global, remains rooted in the local, persisting as a loose collection of grassroots movements and actions. Anti-capitalism needs to develop a coherent and cohering philosophy, something which cultural theory and the intellectual legacy of the New Left can help to provide, notably through the work of key radical thinkers, such as Ernesto Laclau, Stuart Hall, Antonio Negri, Gilles Deleuze and Judith Butler.
Anticapitalism and Culture argues that there is a strong relationship between the radical tradition of cultural studies and the new political movements which try to resist corporate globalization. Indeed, the two need each other: whilst theory can shape and direct the huge diversity of anticapitalist activism, the energy and sheer political engagement of the anticapitalist movement can breathe new life into cultural studies.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The PostWar Years
11
The Politics of Defeat
41
The AntiCapitalist Movement
75
4 AntiCapitalism and Culture
107
Rhizomatics Radical Democracy and the Power of the Multitude
135
Prospects for Resistance in the Neoliberal Conjuncture
169
Nomadic Strategies for the New Partisans
203
Conclusion
237
Bibliography
241
Index
255
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About the author (2008)

Jeremy Gilbert is Senior Lecturer in Cultural Studies, University of East London, and co-author of Discographies: Dance Music, Culture and the Politics of Sound and Cultural Capitalism: Politics After New Labour

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