Antidiscrimination Law and Social Equality

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Yale University Press, Sep 1, 1998 - Law - 276 pages
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This important book addresses head-on the controversy over attempts to reshape society in the name of antidiscrimination. While most Americans understand that racism and similar ideologies are so destructive that the state should do what it can to eradicate them, this understanding conflicts with another widely held idea, that the shaping of citizens' beliefs is not a legitimate objective of a liberal state. Andrew Koppelman argues that the modern conception of antidiscrimination law as a project of cultural transformation is consistent with, and even demanded by, principles of liberty. He clarifies the moral principles that should guide a society in which some groups, such as blacks, women, and homosexuals, are unfairly stigmatized.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER
13
CHAPTER
57
CHAPTER THREE
115
CHAPTER FOUR
146
CHAPTER FIVE
177
CHAPTER
220
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About the author (1998)

Andrew Koppelman is John Paul Stevens Professor of Law at Northwestern University.

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