Antike, renaissance und puritanismus: eine studie zur englischen literaturgeschuchte des 16. und 17. jahrhunderts

Front Cover
M. Hueber, 1924 - English literature - 233 pages
 

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 199 - And all the rule, one empire; only add Deeds to thy knowledge answerable, add faith, Add virtue, patience, temperance, add love, By name to come called charity, the soul Of all the rest: then wilt thou not be loth To leave this Paradise, but shalt possess A paradise within thee, happier far.
Page 165 - Remove their swelling epithets, thick laid As varnish on a harlot's cheek, the rest, Thin sown with aught of profit or delight, Will far be found unworthy to compare With Sion's songs, to all true tastes excelling...
Page 55 - Not that fair field Of Enna, where Proserpine gathering flowers, Herself a fairer flower, by gloomy Dis Was gathered, which cost Ceres all that pain To seek her through the world...
Page 60 - Tempt not the Lord thy God.'" He said, and stood; But Satan, smitten with amazement, fell. As when Earth's son...
Page 165 - The schools of ancient sages ; his, who bred Great Alexander to subdue the world, Lyceum there, and painted Stoa next : There shalt thou hear and learn the secret power Of harmony, in tones and numbers hit By voice or hand, and various-measured verse, jEolian charms and Dorian lyric odes, And his who gave them breath, but higher sung, Blind Melesigenes, thence Homer call'd, Whose poem Phoebus challenged for his own...
Page 165 - Thence what the lofty grave tragedians taught In chorus or iambic, teachers best Of moral prudence, with delight received In brief sententious precepts, while they treat Of fate, and chance, and change in human life, High actions, and high passions best describing : Thence to the famous orators repair, Those ancient, whose resistless eloquence Wielded at will that fierce democratic, Shook the arsenal, and fulmined over Greece To Macedon and Artaxerxes...
Page 162 - Or if occasion shall lead, to imitate those magnific odes and hymns, wherein Pindarus and Callimachus are in most things worthy, some others in their frame judicious, in their matter most an end faulty. But those frequent songs throughout the law and prophets beyond all these, not in their divine argument alone, but in the very critical art of composition, may be easily made appear over all the kinds of lyric poesy to be incomparable.
Page 70 - Religion, and therefore that was better then none at all. But to us who have no need of them, to us who deride their folly, and are wearied with their impertinencies, they ought to appear no better arguments for Verse, then those of their worthy Successors, the Knights Errant.
Page 53 - Coasting the Tyrrhene shore, as the winds listed, On Circe's island fell. (Who knows not Circe, The daughter of the Sun, whose charmed cup Whoever tasted lost his upright shape, And downward fell into a grovelling swine...
Page 52 - In bigness to surpass earth's giant sons, Now less than smallest dwarfs in narrow room Throng numberless...

Bibliographic information