Antique Gems and Rings, Volume 2

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Bell and Daldy, 1872 - Art, Ancient - 483 pages
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Page ix - ... the neck. It appears almost incredible that they should make this hole in so hard a substance without any iron instrument for the purpose. What they are said to use is the pointed flexible leaf-shoot...
Page 2 - ... of the tribe affords. A suitable stone for such a purpose will be picked up and carried hundreds of miles. Mr. Kane informs me that, in coming down the Athabaska River, when drawing near its source in the Rocky Mountains, he observed his Assinaboin guides select the favourite bluish jasper from among the water-worn stones in the bed of the river, to carry home for the purpose of pipe manufacture, although they were then fully five hundred miles from their lodges.
Page 23 - Let the engraving upon the gem of your ring be either a dove, or a fish, or a ship running before the wind, or a musical lyre, the device used by Polycrates, or a ship's anchor...
Page ix - Tushaua wears as the symbol of his authority, for it is generally of the largest size, and is worn transversely across the breast, for which purpose the hole is bored lengthways from one end to the other, an operation which I was informed sometimes occupies two lives. The stones themselves are procured from a great distance up the river, probably from near its sources at the base of the Andes ; they are therefore highly valued, and it is seldom the owners can be induced to part with them, the chiefs...
Page ii - ASHMOLEAN LIBRARY, OXFORD This book is to be returned on or before the last date stamped below.
Page 23 - If the device represents a man fishing, the wearer will be put in mind of the Apostles, and of the little children drawn up out of the water. For we must not engrave upon it idols, which we are forbidden even to look upon ; nor a sword or bow, for we are followers of peace; nor a drinking cup, for we are sober men.
Page 2 - Indians is a coarse species of jasper also too hard to admit of elaborate ornamentation. This also is cut into various simple but tasteful designs, executed chiefly by the slow and laborious process of rubbing it down with other stones. The choice of the material for fashioning the favourite pipe, is by no means invariably guided by the facilities which the location of the tribe affords.
Page 1 - It is a fine marble, much too hard to admit of minute carving, but taking a high polish. This is cut into pipes of graceful form, and made so extremely thin, as to be nearly transparent, so that when lighted the glowing tobacco shines through, and presents a singular appearance when in use at night or in a dark lodge.
Page ix - ... really quartz imperfectly crystallized. These stones are from four to eight inches long, and about an inch in diameter. They are ground round, and flat at the ends, a work of great...
Page 2 - The choice of the material for fashioning the favourite pipe, is by no means invariably guided by the facilities which the location of the tribe affords. A suitable stone for such a purpose will be picked up and carried hundreds of miles. Mr. Kane informs me that, in coming down the...

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