Antoine Lavoisier: Science, Administration and Revolution

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 11, 1996 - Biography & Autobiography - 351 pages
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First published in 1993, this biography, first published in 1993, represents a comprehensive, accessible account of the great eighteenth-century French chemist and administrator, Antoine Lavoisier. Historians of science know Lavoisier as a founder of modern chemistry. Students of the French Revolution know him as an important financier and administrator in the final decades of the old regime and as the most famous scientist to be guillotined during the Terror. This volume devotes equal attention to the creation of his oxygen theory of combustion and to his efforts as a public administrator before and during the Revolution. Lavoisier was a historical figure of extraordinary importance. His biography illuminates the rise of modern science and the history of the French Revolution. Antoine Lavoisier provides its reader with a vivid, informed image of the man, his achievement and the tumultuous age in which he lived.
 

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Contents

The Barristers of Paris
11
The Republic of Science
25
Experimental Physics
45
The Chemistry of Salts
74
The Company of Tax Farmers
110
Consolidation and Contestation 1775 to 1789
131
A New Theory of Combustion
133
The Campaign for French Chemistry
157
Mesmerism and Public Opinion
211
Revolutionary Politics 1789 to 1794
235
Representation Legislation and Finance
237
The Republic of Virtue
269
Notes
303
Bibliography
327
Index
339
Copyright

Gunpowder and Agriculture
188

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