A Patterned Past: Form and Thought in Early Chinese Historiography

Front Cover
Harvard Univ Asia Center, 2001 - History - 503 pages
1 Review

In this comprehensive study of the rhetoric, narrative patterns, and intellectual content of the Zuozhuan and Guoyu, David Schaberg reads these two collections of historical anecdotes as traces of a historiographical practice that flourished around the fourth century B.C.E. among the followers of Confucius. He contends that the coherent view of early China found in these texts is an effect of their origins and the habits of reading they impose. Rather than being totally accurate accounts, they represent the efforts of a group of officials and ministers to argue for a moralizing interpretation of the events of early Chinese history and for their own value as skilled interpreters of events and advisers to the rulers of the day.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
The Rhetoric of Good Order
21
We1 and the Meaning of Verbal
57
Intelligibility in the Extrahuman World
96
Order in the Human World
125
The Anecdotal History
163
Narrative and Recompense
191
Aesthetics and Meaning
222
Writing and the Ends of History
256
Orality and the Origins of the Zuozbuan and Guoyu
315
Notes
327
Works Cited
443
Chinese Character List
471
Index Locorum
487
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2001)

David Schaberg is Associate Professor of Chinese at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Bibliographic information