Apocalypse in Australian Fiction and Film: A Critical Study

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McFarland, Feb 14, 2011 - Literary Criticism - 240 pages
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Australia has been a frequent choice of location for narratives about the end of the world in science fiction and speculative works, ranging from pre-colonial apocalyptic maps to key literary works from the last fifty years. This critical work explores the role of Australia in both apocalyptic literature and film. Works and genres covered include Nevil Shute's popular novel On the Beach, Mad Max, children's literature, Indigenous writing, and cyberpunk. The text examines ways in which apocalypse is used to undermine complacency, foretell environmental disasters, critique colonization, and to serve as a means of protest for minority groups. Australian apocalypse imagines Australia at the ends of the world, geographically and psychologically, but also proposes spaces of hope for the future.
 

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Contents

Preface
1
Introduction
3
1 An Apocalyptic Map
23
2 The Shield of Distance
54
3 An Apocalyptic Landscape
83
4 Children of the Apocalypse
108
5 ReWriting the End of the World
135
6 The End of the Human
159
Conclusion
186
Chapter Notes
191
Bibliography
201
Index
219
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About the author (2011)

Roslyn Weaver is a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Western Sydney, Australia. Her research interests include apocalypse, popular culture, children's literature, and speculative fiction. Donald E. Palumbo is a professor of English at East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina. He lives in Greenville. C.W. Sullivan III is Distinguished Professor of arts and sciences at East Carolina University and a full member of the Welsh Academy. He is the author of numerous books and the on-line journal Celtic Cultural Studies.

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