Apocalyptic Messianism and Contemporary Jewish-American Poetry

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SUNY Press, 1986 - Poetry - 137 pages
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Focusing on the rich context of esoteric Jerish literature, this collection presents in-depth analyses of Jewish-American poetry. Gitenstein defines Jewish messianism and the literary genre of the apocalyptic, describes historical movements and kabbalistic theories, and analyzes their influence as part of the post-Holocaust consciousness. Represented are works by such poets as Irving Feldman, Jack Hirschman, John Hollander, David Meltzer, and Jerome Rothenberg.

Gitenstein recounts the lives of such spectacular eccentrics and holy men as the Abraham Abulafia (thirteenth century), Isaac Luria (sixteenth century), Shabbatai Zevi (seventeenth century), and Jacob Frank (eighteenth century) and identifies their theories as part of the history of the literary apocalyptic genre-the literature of exile, the literature of catastrophe.
 

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Contents

Definitions And Historic Contexts
11
Apocalyptic Historiography And The Messianic Hopeful
37
Allegory And The Messianic Story
57
The Messianic Ontology
83
Conclusion
109
Notes
113
Bibliography
125
Index
133
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Page 6 - I see your words wrung out in pain, but never The true compassion for creatures with you, that Dante Knew in his nine hells. O eagle! master! The eagle's ways of pride and scorn will not save Though the voice cries loud in humility. Thomas, Thomas, Come, let us pray together for our exile. You, hypocrite lecteur! mon semblable! mon frère!

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About the author (1986)

R. Barbara Gitenstein is Associate Professor of English and chairs the Department of English, State University of New York at Oswego.

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