Apoptosis Genes

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James W. Wilson, Catherine Booth, C. S. Potten
Springer Science & Business Media, 1998 - Medical - 310 pages
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Apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is a natural process by which damaged or unwanted cells are dismantled in an orderly and atraumatic fashion. It is of critical importance in development, homeostasis, and cell population control. Research over the last decade is now enabling scientists to comprehend how genes and the protein products interact to control apoptosis. This has led to the current position where researchers may be able to directly modify the action of key proteins through gene therapy and antisense oligonucleotides.
Apoptosis Genes presents a current overview of key genes involved in the control of apoptosis research together with thoughts on future prospects and clinical applications. While there are several books written on apoptosis, Apoptosis Genes deals specifically with the regulation of apoptosis. Given the increased interest in the role of apoptosis genes in disease processes, this work will be useful to researchers investigating cancer, autoimmune disease, viral infection, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disorders, AIDS, osteoporosis, and aging.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The role of p53 in apoptosis
5
Mammalian bcl2 family genes
37
Stressresponsive signal transduction emerging concepts and biological significance
85
Control of Apoptosis Through Gene Regulation
119
Adhesion and Apoptosis
143
Death signalling in C elegans and activation mechanisms of caspases
167
Apoptosis in Drosophila
205
Viral genes that modulate apoptosis
243
Therapeutic manipulation of apoptosis in cancer and neurological disease
281
Index
305
Copyright

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Page 238 - Kerr, JFR, Wyllie, AH, and Currie, AR (1972) Apoptosis: a basic biological phenomenon with wide-ranging implications in tissue kinetics.
Page 300 - ONYX-015. an E1B gene-attenuated adenovirus, causes tumor-specific cytolysis and antitumoral efficacy that can be augmented by standard chemotherapeutic agents. Nat Med 1997; 3: 639-645.

About the author (1998)

Wilson is director of Data and Decision.

DAUGHTER OF ALEXANDER BOOTH & CO FOUNDER OF SALVATION

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