Apoptosis in Health and Disease: Clinical and Therapeutic Aspects

Front Cover
Martin Holcik, Eric C. LaCasse, Alex E. MacKenzie, Robert G. Korneluk
Cambridge University Press, Feb 17, 2005 - Medical - 249 pages
The process of programmed cell death or apoptosis has, in the decade preceding the publication of this 2005 book, been shown to be centrally involved in the pathogenesis of the significant majority of human illnesses and injury states. The cellular attrition observed in most degenerative conditions is apoptotic in nature; conversely a failure of apoptosis has been proposed to underlie many forms of cancer. The central role of apoptosis in human disease clearly brings with it clinical promise; for example, the strong possibility exists that attenuation of apoptotic death will significantly modulate the severity of degenerative disorders. Similarly, conditions, such as cancer, autoimmune disease, psoriasis and endometriosis, in which aberrant cellular proliferation is observed, may benefit from enhanced rates of apoptosis. This book surveys the underlying molecular mechanisms of apoptosis, investigates its role in degenerative and other diseases, and evaluates potential therapies that will permit appropriate activation or inhibition of apoptosis in disease and injury states.
 

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Contents

Contributors
1
1
2
1
17
6
24
R Chris Bleackley Ottawa and Apoptosis Research Centre
29
1
49
1
55
Apoptosis during mammalian development
61
10
122
24
134
28
140
incidence regulation
156
61
177
88
184
Cytotoxic lymphocytes apoptosis and autoimmunity
188
1
194

Apoptosis and cancer
75
Reactivating the death pathway to combat cancer
82
On the horizon
88
Neuronal cell death in human neurodegenerative diseases and their
96
Molecular and cellular regulation of apoptosis
102
3
201
Pro and antiapoptotic strategies of viruses
219
Index
246
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Page 239 - Henderson, S., Huen, D., Rowe, M., Dawson, C., Johnson, G., and Rickinson, A. (1993) Epstein-Barr virus-coded BHRF1 protein, a viral homologue of bcl-2, protects human B cells from programmed cell death. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90, 8479-8483.
Page 206 - Blockade of interleukin 6 trans signaling suppresses T-cell resistance against apoptosis in chronic intestinal inflammation: Evidence in Crohn disease and experimental colitis in vivo. Nat Med 2000;6:583-588.
Page 236 - The gamma, 34.5 gene of herpes simplex virus 1 precludes neuroblastoma cells from triggering total shutoff of protein synthesis characteristic of programmed cell death in neuronal cells.

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