Applied Data Analytic Techniques For Turning Points Research

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Patricia Cohen
Routledge, Oct 12, 2012 - Psychology - 256 pages
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This innovative volume demonstrates the use of a range of statistical approaches that examine "turning points" (a change in direction, magnitude, or meaning) in real data. Analytic techniques are illustrated with real longitudinal data from a variety of fields. As such the book will appeal to a variety of researchers including:

  • Developmental researchers interested in identifying factors precipitating turning points at various life stages.
  • Medical or substance abuse researchers looking for turning points in disease or recovery.
  • Social researchers interested in estimating the effects of life experiences on subsequent behavioral changes.
  • Interpersonal behavior researchers looking to identify turning points in relationships.
  • Brain researchers needing to discriminate the onset of an experimentally produced process in a participant.

The book opens with the goals and theoretical considerations in defining turning points. An overview of the methods presented in subsequent chapters is then provided. Chapter goals include discriminating "local" from long-term effects, identifying variables altering the connection between trajectories at different life stages, locating non-normative turning points, coping with practical distributional problems in trajectory analyses, and changes in the meaning and connections between variables in the transition to adulthood. From an applied perspective, the book explores such topics as antisocial/aggressive trajectories at different life stages, the impact of imprisonment on criminal behavior, family contact trajectories in the transition to adulthood, sustained effects of substance abuse, alternative models of bereavement, and identifying brain changes associated with the onset of a new brain process.

Ideal for advanced students and researchers interested in identifying significant change in data in a variety of fields including psychology, medicine, education, political science, criminology, and sociology.

 

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Contents

Chapter 2 The interrelationship of temporally distinct risk markers and the transition from childhood physical aggression to adolescent violent delinq...
17
Chapter 3 Estimating timevarying causes and outcomes with application to incarceration and crime
37
Chapter 4 Turning points in family contact during emerging adulthood
61
Competing models of substance abuse and desistance in young adulthood
81
Chapter 6 Modeling agebased turning points in longitudinal lifespan growth curves of cognition
105
Modeling betweenperson variability in adjustment to conjugal loss
129
Chapter 8 Application of change point theory to modeling staterelated activity in fMRI
149
Chapter 9 Using an econometric model of change points to locate turning points in individual time series
183
Appendix 1 Computer programs for changepoint analysis
215
Appendix 2 Equivalent forms of the Level 1 equation for the bereavement model in Chapter 7
219
Appendix 3A The variance of the EWMA statistic assuming ARMA 11 noise
221
Appendix 3B Maximum likelihood estimation of change point
227
Appendix 3C EM algorithm for Gaussian mixture model
231
Appendix 3D Estimating variance components using restricted maximum likelihood
233
Author Index
235
Subject Index
241

Chapter 10 Developmental structural change in the maturity of role assumption
195

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About the author (2012)

Dr. Patricia Cohen is Professor of Clinical Epidemiology in Psychiatry at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and the New York State Psychiatric Institute, where she has been since her Ph.D. in Social Psychology from New York University. She is best known for her texts on multiple regression analyses written with her husband Jacob Cohen, and for the over 200 published articles on the onset and course of mental illness based on her 30 year study of a general population cohort of children, the Children in the Community study.

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