Applied Social Science for Early Years

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SAGE, Jul 25, 2008 - Education - 136 pages
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Applying social science subjects such as psychology, sociology, social policy and research methods to Early Years can help to raise standards and ensure good practice. These subjects inform much of the academic curriculum within many Early Years programmes and are subjects that make an important contribution to understanding children's behaviour, growth and development. The book identifies, analyses and assesses how social science enriches Early Years as opposed to regarding Early Years and social science as distinct. Each chapter imaginatively introduces the main learning objectives and includes formative activities, which apply social science to particular themes to aid students' cognitive skills.
 

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Contents

About the authors and series editors
Sociology and Early Years
Social policy and Early Years
Literacy and learning in Early Years
Different childhoods in different cultures
Research methods for EYPS
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About the author (2008)

Ewan Ingleby is based in the Education section of the School of Social Sciences and Law at the University of Teesside. Alongside contributing to the University of Teesside's education programmes, Ewan is a member of the School of Social Science and Law's 'Social Futures Research Institute' Dr Ingleby has secured research funding from the University Research Fund for research projects on PCET mentor training and student study skills. Previous publications include sociological analyses of organisations, psychological approaches to social work and applications of social science to Early Years.

Geraldine Oliver is a Senior Lecturer in Education/Early Years at the University of Teesside. She is the Programme Coordinator for Early Years at the University of Teesside and has developed academic modules as well as having taught extensively within early years. Her research interests include mentoring and linguistic development.

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