Applying Statistics in the Courtroom: A New Approach for Attorneys and Expert Witnesses

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CRC Press, Jul 11, 2001 - Mathematics - 296 pages
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This publication is directed at both attorneys and statisticians to ensure they will work together successfully on the application of statistics in the law. Attorneys will learn how best to utilize the statistician's talents, while gaining an enriched understanding of the law relevant to audits, jury selection, discrimination, environmental hazards, evidence, and torts as it relates to statistical issues. Statisticians will learn that the law is what judges say it is and to frame their arguments accordingly. This book will increase the effectiveness of both parties in presenting and attacking statistical arguments in the courtroom. Topics covered include sample and survey methods, probability, testing hypotheses, and multiple regression.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 Samples and Populations
3
Chapter 2 Representative Samples and Jury Selection
17
Chapter 3 Sample and Survey Methodology
29
Chapter 4 Presenting Your Case
41
Probability
51
Chapter 5 Probability Concepts
53
Chapter 6 Criminal Law
63
Chapter 7 Civil Law
85
Chapter 10 Methods of Analysis
131
Chapter 11 Correlation
157
Chapter 12 Multiple Regression
175
Applying Statistics in the Courtroom
211
Chapter 13 Preventive Statistics
213
Chapter 14 What Every Statistician Should Know about Courtroom Procedure
243
Chapter 15 Making Effective Use of Statistics and Statisticians
249
References
257

Chapter 8 Environmental Hazards
93
Hypothesis Testing and Estimation
113
Chapter 9 How Large Is Large?
115
Table of Authorities
263
Subject Index
273
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Page 13 - Statistics showing racial or ethnic imbalance are probative in a case such as this one only because such imbalance is often a telltale sign of purposeful discrimination; absent explanation, it is ordinarily to be expected that nondiscriminatory hiring practices will in time result in a work force more or less representative of the racial and ethnic composition of the population in the community from which employees are hired.
Page 10 - ... when although there is evidence to support it, the reviewing court on the entire evidence is left with a definite and firm conviction that a mistake has been committed.
Page v - For the rational study of the law the black-letter man may be the man of the present, but the man of the future is the man of statistics and the master of economics.

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