Aquarium Plants

Front Cover
BowTie, 2004 - Pets - 96 pages
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Aquarium Plants is overflowing with full-color photographs—over 300 in all—that bring the many beautiful plants in this book to life. Author Peter Hiscock, an expert in aquascaping and fish keeping, begins with an animated science lesson on how plants grow, giving readers a quick background that to help them improve their aquatic green thumbs. The text addresses such vital topics as water quality, use of substrates, choosing healthy plants, and planting techniques, offering aquarists all the information they need to know to establish a well-planted, vibrant aquarium. In the chapter on lighting, the author has provided lists of plants that thrive in low, moderate, bright, and very bright light and explains the differing effects of light on plants. Aquarium Plants offers essential information on feeding plants, propagating plants, keeping plants healthy and choosing fish. Creative aquarists will welcome the sections on designing the aquarium, using various elements of display, and creating a themed tank (such as an African theme or a cold or hard water aquarium).

The section “Popular Aquarium Plants” recommends specific plants for different areas of the aquarium, including background, foreground, midground, and floating plants. For each, the author offers dozens of options, all of which are represented by color photographs.

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How plants grow
Water quality
Choosing plants

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About the author (2004)

Peter Veth is Director of Research at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, Canberra. He is the author of over 100 articles and books on the archaeology of arid zone hunter-gatherers.

Mike Smith is Director of Research and Development at the National Museum of Australia. He pioneered research into late Pleistocene settlement in the Australian desert and has worked extensively across the arid zone attempting to piece together its human and environmental history.

Peter Hiscock is a Reader in the School of Archaeology and Anthropology at the Australian National University.

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