Arab and Israeli Terrorism: The Causes and Effects of Political Violence, 1936-1993

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McFarland, Dec 1, 1996 - Social Science - 269 pages
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Historically, terrorism has generally failed as a means to reach a political objective. Most often, terrorist incidents have brought fear to the civilian sector, but only served to harden the attitudes of governments. Despite this, indiscriminate, anticivilian violence steadily increased in the last half century, particularly in the Middle East. This work provides an historical overview of terrorism in the region, focusing on specific guerrilla actions. The hijackings of the 1960s, the Black September attack during the 1972 Munich Olympics, and the rise of Abu Nidal are all covered thoroughly, as are many other groups and incidents in the Middle East. The ineffectiveness of counter-terrorism, showing how it often precipitates the rise of small terrorist cliques, is also covered. Particular attention is given to Israel's response to terrorism and the effect of terrorism on the country's development and national psyche.
 

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Contents

Preface
1
Introduction
3
The Arab General Strike
9
The Struggle for Statehood
17
Israels Use of Arab Disguises
26
Birth of the Palestinian Guerrillas
36
We Have Taken Over Your Flight
48
Black September vs Mossad
58
Death to the Jews
118
Lebanon War
125
Deadtime
136
The Heyday
145
The Questionable 980s
159
The Business of the FRC
174
The Manufacture of Modern Terrorism
185
Greece
193

The Rise of Abu Nidal
77
The Rejectionists
84
Abu Nidal in Iraq
90
Intelligence Capability
101
Death to the Arabs
107
The Departure of Abu Bakr and the Death of Abu Iyad
201
Conclusions
207
Notes
215
Bibliography
247
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About the author (1996)

Born in Lebanon and raised in San Francisco, Kameel B. Nasr is a writer and an activist for peace and reconciliation. He divides his time between Italy and the United States.

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