Arab in America

Front Cover
Last Gasp, 2007 - Comics & Graphic Novels - 117 pages
3 Reviews
The eye-opening story of the life of an average Arab-American struggling with his identity in an increasingly hostile nation. Using the graphic novel as his medium, Lebanon-born Toufic El Rassi chronicles his experience growing up Arab in America. Keen observations, clever insights and painful honesty make El Rassi's work shine as a critical 21st century memoir. From childhood through adolescence, and as an adult, El Rassi illustrates the prejudice and discrimination Arabs and Muslims experience in American society. He contends with ignorant teachers, racist neighbors, bullying classmates, and a growing sense of alienation. El Rassi recounts his personal experiences after the 9/11 attacks and during the implementation of new security and immigration laws that followed. El Rassi gives context to current world events, providing readers with an overview of the modern history of the Middle East, including the Gulf wars. He also examines the roles American films and news media play in creating negative stereotypes of Arab-Americans, showing how difficult it is to have an Arab identity in a society saturated with anti-Arab images and messages.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - sometimeunderwater - LibraryThing

Nothing stuck with me. Think it was more edutainment than entertaining, though I have to confess I barely remember it (review written a couple of months after). Read full review

Arab in America

User Review  - anch0rup - Overstock.com

My daughter is a Journalism major in college and needed this book by November 15th for a Global & Cultural Studies class. I looked in every local bookstore only to be told that it was outofprint and ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
vi
Section 2
vii
Section 3
40
Section 4
84
Section 5
85
Section 6
86
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Toufic El Rassi was born in Beirut in 1978 to an Egyptian mother and Lebanese father. He immigrated to Chicago a year later as his family escaped the civil war in Lebanon. He is a college lecturer in history and political science, a writer, and a graphic novelist and commentator on Middle Eastern affairs. He lives in Chicago.

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