Handbuch der Orientalistik: Der Nahe und Mittlere Osten, Volumes 1-4; Volume 5, Parts 1-2

Front Cover
BRILL, 1994 - Design - 434 pages
0 Reviews
Eventually to be completed in six volumes, Arabic Literature of Africa will provide a survey of Muslim authors writing in Arabic in Saharan and sub-Saharan Africa and a bibliography of their works. Falling within the tradition of the great works of Brockelmann and Sezgin, it will form a basic reference tool for the study of Arabic writing in areas of the African Islamic world that fall outside the parameters of these works. While primarily a work of reference, it will also attempt to provide an outline of the intellectual history of Muslim societies in the areas it covers: the Nile valley, East Africa and the Horn of Africa, West Africa and the western Sahara, from earliest times to the present. The first volume covers Eastern Sudanic Africa (mainly the modern Sudan) until approximately 1900. It comprises twelve chapters organised by theme or period and aims to present as complete a coverage as the present state of our knowledge will allow.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

The Sudanese Nile Valley before 1820
11
Chronicles and Related Materials
41
Popular Poetry
73
The Sammaniyya Tradition
91
The Idrisiyya Tradition
123
The Sanusiyya Tradition
166
The Writings of Ismacil alWall and his Descendants
228
The Writings of the Majadhib
243
The Hindiyya Qadiriyya Sacdiyya and Tijaniyya
277
The Writings of the Mahdiyya
304
GENERAL BIBLIOGRAPHY
342
d European Languages
360
INDICES
374
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1994)

R.S. O'Faheywas educated (B.A. & Ph.D.) at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. He has taught at Khartoum and Edinburgh and presently holds a chair in Middle Eastern and African History at the University of Bergen. Previous books include Kingdoms of the Sudan(with J.L. Spaulding), London 1974; State and Society in Dār Fūr, London 1980; Land in Dār Fūr(with M.I. Abu Salim), Cambridge 1983, and Enigmatic Saint. Aḥmad ibn Idrīs and the Idrīsī Tradition, London 1990.