Archaeologia Cambrensis

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W. Pickering, 1912 - Electronic journals
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Page 1 - Wiltshire, Yorkshire, members of the Council and Earthworks Committee, and other Delegates who omitted to sign the register. The Report of the Council, for the year 1911-12, was read and approved, and the Statement of Accounts, audited by Mr. W. Minet, FSA, was read and adopted. The thanks of the Meeting were given to Mr. Minet for his services and he was appointed Honorary Auditor for the ensuing year. Council for the year 1912-13 : — The following were elected as the Council : — The Officers...
Page 24 - Fortresses party inaccessible by reason of precipices, cliffs, or water, defended in part only by artificial works. B. Fortresses on hill-tops with artificial defences, following the natural line of the hill. > Or, though usually on high ground, less dependent on natural slopes for protection. c. Rectangular or other enclosures of simple plan (including forts and towns of the Romano-British period). D. Forts consisting only of a mount with encircling moat or fosse.
Page 239 - TEEMING, BITTER PANGS, AND HARD TRAVAILE, that she hath undergone in bringing forth her first-borne. (Being a Precious Babe of Grace.) With the cruelty of Mistris London, her Midwife; and great Affection of Mrs. Synod, her Nurse, Mrs. Schisme, Mrs. Priviledge, Mrs. Ordinance, Mrs. Universall Toleration, and Mrs. Leveller, her Gossips.
Page 24 - Fortresses on hill-tops with artificial defences, following the natural line of the hill. Or, though usually on high ground, less dependent on natural slopes for protection. c. Rectangular or other enclosures of simple plan (including forts and towns of the Romano-British period). D. Forts consisting only of a mount with encircling moat or fosse. E. Fortified mounts, wholly or partly artificial, with remains of an attached court or bailey, or showing two or more such courts. F. Homestead moats, consisting...
Page 1 - President of the Society of Antiquaries, in the Chair. The Congress was attended by Delegates from the Society of Antiquaries, the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, the British...
Page 400 - The tirst storey was on the surface of the ground, where were cellars and granaries, and great boxes, tuns, casks, and other domestic utensils. In the storey above were the dwelling and common living rooms of the residents, in which were the larders, the rooms of the bakers and butlers, and the great chamber in which the lord and his wife slept. Adjoining this was a private room, the dormitory of the waiting maids and children. In the inner part of the great chamber was a certain private room, where...
Page 400 - In this storey also the watchmen and the servants appointed to keep the house took their sleep at some time or other. High up on the east side of the house, in a convenient place was the chapel, which was made like unto the tabernacle of Solomon in its ceiling and painting.
Page 1 - MA, LL.D. JB Willis-Bund, MA, FSA Dr. William Martin, FSA, was re-elected Hon. Secretary and the thanks of the Meeting expressed to him for his services in the past year. * Congress is indebted to Mr Ralph Nevill, FHA, for bis compilation til these Minutes.
Page 66 - But, as his plans were not matured, he had no fleet. The skill and resolution of the general accomplished the passage. With some picked men of the auxiliaries, disencumbered of all baggage, who knew the shallows and had that national experience in swimming which enables the Britons to take care not only of themselves but of their arms and horses, he delivered so unexpected an attack that the astonished enemy who were looking for a fleet, a naval armament, and an assault by sea, thought that to such...
Page 400 - Arnold, lord of Ardres, built on the motte of Ardres a wooden house, excelling all the houses of Flanders of that period both in material and in carpenter's work. The first storey was on the surface of the ground, where were cellars and granaries, and great boxes, tuns, casks and other domestic utensils. In the storey above were the dwelling- and common...

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