Archaeology for Kids

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Chicago Review Press, Oct 1, 2001 - History - 160 pages
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This activity book features 25 projects such as making a surface survey of a site, building a screen for sifting dirt and debris at a dig, tracking soil age by color, and counting tree rings to date a find, teaches kids the techniques that unearthed Neanderthal caves, Tutankhamun's tomb, the city of Pompeii, and Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec empire. Kids will delight in fashioning a stone-age tool, playing a seriation game with old photographs of cars, "reading" objects excavated in their own backyards, and using patent numbers to date modern artifacts as they gain an overview of human history and the science that brings it back to life.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 How Archaeology Works
1
Chapter 2 The First People
15
Chapter 3 The Ice Age and the New Stone Age
29
Chapter 4 The First Civilizations
47
Chapter 5 Greece and Rome
67
Chapter 6 The New World
85
Chapter 7 Historical Archaeology
101
Glossary
127
Web Sites to Explore
131
Bibliography
133
Photo Credits
137
Index
139
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About the author (2001)

Richard Panchyk is the author of Archaeology for Kids and the coauthor of Engineering the City. Both of his grandfathers and three of his great-uncles were soldiers in World War II. He lives on Long Island in New York.