Architectural Description of Kirkstall Abbey, Volume 16

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Privately printed for the Thoresby society, 1907 - Abbeys - 149 pages
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Page 75 - ... senses. But among us, who have gone out from among the people ; among us, who have forsaken whatever things are fair and costly for Christ's sake ; who have regarded all things beautiful to the eye, soft to the ear, agreeable to the smell, sweet to the taste, pleasant to the touch — all things, in a word, which can gratify the body — as dross and dung, that we might gain Christ, of whom among us, I ask, can devotion be excited by such means ? " Or, to speak plainly, is it not avarice —...
Page 76 - O vanity of vanities ! but not more vain than foolish. The church's walls are resplendent, but the poor are not there. . . . The curious find wherewith to amuse themselves ; the wretched find no stay for them in their misery. Why, at least, do we not reverence the images of the saints, with which the very pavement we walk on is covered. Often an angel's mouth is spit into, and the face of some saint trodden on by...
Page 76 - What has all this to do with monks, with professors of poverty, with men of spiritual minds ? "Again, in the cloisters, what is the meaning of those ridiculous monsters, of that deformed beauty, that beautiful deformity, before the very eyes of the brethren when reading ? What are disgusting monkeys there for (or...
Page 54 - Meaux, in 1349, the conversi were only 7 in number, all of whom died of the Great Pestilence, as well as 32 out of 42 monks then in the abbey. It was probably on account of the fearful mortality caused by this terrible scourge, as well as because the gradual spread of education and other causes had extinguished the class from which they had been formerly drawn, that after the middle of the fourteenth century the conversi in this country seem as a class to have died out, and to have been replaced...
Page 52 - Consuetudines the cellarer's building is called the cellarium, a name which, except as showing that it formed part of the cellarer's department, does not give any clue to its actual use. As a matter of fact this building was for the accommodation of the conversi or lay brothers: their frater and various offices forming the ground floor, while the upper story was their dorter.
Page 75 - ... polishing, and strange designs, which, while they attract the eyes of the worshipper, hinder the soul's devotion, and somehow remind me of the old Jewish ritual. However, let all this pass ; we will suppose it is done, as we are told, for the glory of God. But, a monk myself, I do ask other monks...
Page 87 - ... Abbey Church, chiefly of the end of the I3th century. Attention is specially directed to the recent excavations in the choir, which have disclosed remains of the church, commenced towards the end of the nth century. The plan is a particularly interesting one, and shows three apsidal chapels en echelon on the east side of each arm of the transept, the inner chapel (next the choir), on each side being finished square externally, so that, including the great apse of the choir, there were seven apses...
Page 1 - The site is described as covered with woods and unproductive of crops, a place well-nigh destitute of good things, save timber and stone, and a pleasant valley with the Aire flowing through the middle of it. ... By the industry of the monks space was soon cleared for the new buildings, while the convent itself was increased in the number of brethren and the tale of its possessions. For the abbot, being a man of piety and prudence, watched with unwearying sagacity over the progress of his house in...
Page 1 - ... own cost. The date of Henry de Lacy's death is uncertain, but he apparently survived Abbot Alexander, who, after ruling the house for thirty-five years, died in 1182. In his days "the buildings of Kirkstall were erected of stone and wood brought there, that is the church and both dorters to wit, of the monks and of the lay brothers, both their fraters and the cloister, the chapter house and other offices necessary within the abbey, and all these were covered excellently with tiles. ..." The infirmary...
Page 76 - It is spent that it may be increased, and plenty is born of profusion. By the sight of wonderful and costly vanities men are prompted to give, rather than to pray. Some beautiful picture of a saint is exhibited — and the brighter the colours the greater the holiness attributed to it ; men run, eager to kiss ; they are invited to give, and the beautiful is more admired than the sacred is revered. In the churches are suspended, not...

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