Architectural drawing and draughtsmen

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Cassell & company, limited, 1912 - Architecture - 96 pages
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Page 84 - ... ya plus de poésie, plus d'accidents, je ne dis pas dans une chaumière, mais dans un seul arbre qui a souffert des années et des saisons, que dans toute la façade d'un palais. Il faut ruiner un palais pour en faire un objet d'intérêt. Tant il est vrai que, quel que soit le faire, point de vraie beauté sans l'idéal.
Page 85 - This Gothic method of design in poetry may be, in some sort, illustrated by what is called the Gothic method of design in Gardening.
Page 73 - Vandike used to say) not to be equalled by whatever great masters in his time, for boldness, softness, sweetness, and sureness of his...
Page 77 - the plans, elevations, and sections of the most regular and elegant buildings, both public and private, in the kingdom of Ireland, with variety of new designs, in large folio plates, engraven on copper by the best hands, and drawn either from the buildings themselves, or the original designs of the architect, in the same size, paper, and manner of
Page 90 - The result is that architectural draughtsmanship now stands in a very different position from what it did thirty years ago. But danger still lurks in the background, and the danger is that students, instead of learning to become good draughtsmen — that is, instead of acquiring the power of drawing anything by study of buildings, of natural objects, and of the life — tend to concentrate on the fashionable manner of the time. At present it is the French manner — excellent, accomplished, and within...
Page 82 - There is a Third Volume in hand, any gentleman paying five guineas towards the Graving, may have their Seat inserted, it being very forward, which is only half what the former...
Page 69 - England in the early part of the last century, and appeared in quite another form in the pedantic and finicking designs of Percier and Fontaine. . . . On the other hand, no one ever possessed a keener sense of the dignity of architecture and of its poetry. The quality of genius, which raised him above other artists, was shown not only in his assured and astonishing technique, but in a certain imaginative outlook on architecture — in his conception of it as a great and even stupendous art, full...
Page 6 - For this reason, the director of a career conference has to know what he wants to do and how he is going to do it.
Page 9 - ... in fact. The explanation is that it is not only that the eye sees the buildings in perspective, but the brain takes its share in the process. Impressions are formed with lightning rapidity. Knowledge previously acquired comes into play ; and unconsciously, because it is done so instantaneously, the mind jumps from what it sees to much that it does not see. The net result left in the mind by the observation of a building is its perspective modified by several other considerations. A...
Page 12 - Siena soon after 1310, when he was appointed capo-mœstro of the Duomo. These drawings, which were not carried out, are not really working drawings, inasmuch as they are set out in slight perspective which, though not correct, is near enough to make one doubt whether they can be as early as 1310, and one's suspicions are heightened by the precision of the draughtsmanship and the fine drawings of the figures in the tympanum of the central archway.

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