Architecture: The Subject is Matter

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Jonathan Hill
Psychology Press, 2001 - Architecture - 254 pages
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The aim of this book is to expand the subject and matter of architecture, and to explore their interdependence. There are now many architectures. This book acknowledges architecture far beyond the familiar boundaries of the discipline and reassesses the object at its centre: the building. Architectural matter is not always physical or building fabric. It is whatever architecture is made of, whether words, bricks, blood cells, sounds or pixels. The fifteen chapters are divided into three sections - on buildings, spaces and bodies - which each deal with a particular understanding of architecture and architectural matter.
The richness and diversity of subjects and materials discussed in this book locates architecture firmly in the world as a whole, not just the domain of architects. In stating that architecture is far more than the work of architects, this book aims not to deny the importance of architects in the production of architecture but to see their role in more balanced terms and to acknowledge other architectural producers. Architecture can, for example, be found in the incisions of a surgeon, the instructions of a choreographer or the movements of a user. Architecture can be made of anything and by anyone.
 

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Contents

Jonathan Hill
2
CHAPTER 2
24
Katharine Shonfield
33
Niall Mclaughlin and Martin Richman
46
CHAPTER 4
57
Whats the Matter with Architecture?
73
CHAPTER 6
91
contents
100
CHAPTER 9
134
A Space Inhabited by Angels 131
156
CHAPTER 11
175
of Scars Scrolls Skulls and Stealth
193
CHAPTER 14
223
CHAPTER 15
241
Index
249
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About the author (2001)

Hill is Lecturer in Architecture at University College London.

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