Architecture--art Or Profession?: Three Hundred Years of Architectural Education in Britain

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Manchester University Press, 1994 - Architecture - 210 pages
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Architects are perhaps the most important people involved in shaping the built environment, so the ideas they receive in the course of their training are a major influence upon the buildings and cities of the future. Crinson and Lubbock present a bold new perspective on the evolution of the British architect from Wren to post-modernism and beyond, and provide the first general history of architectural education, making an important contribution to current debates. The Prince of Wales' views on modern architecture and the need for a change in the way architects are trained, has attracted enormous support from the public, resulting in architects and their training being under the spotlight more than ever. The drive to define and promote the architectural profession that began in the eighteenth century and reached its apogee in the 1960s has now begun to unravel. How has this happened? What relation does an architect's education have to the built environment? What lessons are there from the past? This book will be of interest to students, lecturers and all those interested in the debates around contemporary architecture.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
ONE
7
two38
38
THREE
89
FOUR
157
postscr1pt180
184
BIBLIOGRAPHY
193
INDEX
203
Copyright

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