Architecture, Power, and Religion: Hatshepsut, Amun & Karnak in Context

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LIT Verlag Münster, 2012 - Architecture - 400 pages
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This book explores the fundamental question of the origins and nature of monumental religious architecture. The principal argument is that the origins of monumental religious architecture were basically aspatial and that the gradual incorporation of functional space into religious architecture can be related to transformations in religious thought. Although the discussion ranges across the Old World, the argument centers on Egypt and the Egyptian female king Hatshepsut: she set the tone for the New Kingdom by tying her legitimacy to Amun and the monuments she built for him. This leads into the issues of power and political legitimacy, and their relevance to myths. The basic contention is that the political ideologies of the Near Eastern Bronze Age contributed fundamentally to what later became the phenomenon we know as "religion," and that the history of the architecture must be understood in order to understand both religion and architectural space. (Series: Articles on Archaeology / Beitrage zur Archaologie - Vol. 7)
 

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Contents

Architecture
3
Hatshepsut
23
History in Ancient Egypt
55
Geology Climate Society
71
Gods Kings History
91
Temples Kings
125
Tombs Mortuary Literature
131
Temples
177
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247
Historical Conclusions
253
Hatshepsut Conclusions
261
The Consequences
267
Introduction
277
Communal or Public Architecture
303
Religious Architecture
311
Origins Contradictions
321

Edfu
187
Thebes
196
Karnak
209
The Chapelle Rouge
225
Deir elBahri Medinet Habu Luxor
239
Discussions of Architecture
329
Final Conclusions
349
Epilogue
361
Index
398
Copyright

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