Architecture and Revolution: Contemporary Perspectives on Central and Eastern Europe

Front Cover
Neil Leach
Psychology Press, 1999 - Architecture - 238 pages
Architecture and Revolution explores the consequences of the recent revolutions in Central and Eastern Europe from an architectural perspective. The book presents a series of essays which offer a novel and incisive take on some of the pressing questions that now face architects, planners and politicians alike in Central and Eastern Europe as they consider how best to formulate the new architecture for a new Europe. A fundamental part of the problem for Central and Eastern Europe as it struggles to adapt to the West has been the issue of the built environment. The buildings inherited from the communist era have brought with them a range of problems: some are environmentally inadequate, others were designed to serve a now redundant social programme, and others carry the stigma of association with the previous regime. Whilst the physical rehabilitation of towns and cities is a pressing problem, there are important underlying theoretical issues to be addressed.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

the role of practice
38
Notes for a manifesto
53
A postmodern critics kit for interpreting socialist realism
62
History lessons
69
Descartes and the architecture of change
81
the trauma of Ceausescus
92
PART III
115
Traces of the unborn
127
Disjunctions
146
roundtable
163
Bucharest 19809 semioclinical files
177
The Peoples House or the voluptuous violence of
188
Utopia 1988 Romania PostUtopia 1995 Romania
196
the bridal chamber
209
Attacks on the castle
228
Copyright

The humanity of architecture
139

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information