Architecture, Technology, and Process

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Routledge, 2004 - Architecture - 268 pages
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This new selection of essays follows Chris Abel's previous best selling collection, Architecture and Identity. Drawing upon a wide range of knowledge and disciplines, the author argues that, underlying technological changes in the process of architectural production are fundamental changes in the way we think about machines and the world we live in.

Key topics include: new patterns of urbanism in the fast growing cities of asia pacific; metaphorical extensions of mind and body in cyberspace; the divergent European and North American values shaping Sir Norman Foster's and Frank Gehry's work, and the collaborative work methods and technologies creating the adaptable design pratices of today.

* Provides a unique perspective on new developments in architecture and urban design in Asia Pacific and many other parts of the world

* Includes valuable insights into the innovation process

* Shows how biological and cybernetic approaches are reshaping concepts and methods of architectural design and production
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Architecture in the Pacific Century
11
2 Cyberspace in mind
33
3 Technology and process
61
one technology two cultures
91
5 Harry Seidler and the Great Australian Dream
163
6 Mediterranean mix and match
203
Biotech Architecture a manifesto
233
Birth of a cybernetic factory
237
Notes and bibliography
247
Index
263
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About the author (2004)

BIOGRAPHY 2004. Chris Abel is an English born architectural theorist, critic and educator, based in Sydney. After graduating from the Architectural Association in 1968 he worked with the Greater London Council. He joined the teaching staff at Portsmouth Polytechnic School of Architecture three years later. His research and writing career began during the same period and in 1969 Architectural Design began publishing a series of his articles on the future impact of information technology and cybernetics on architectural production. In 1973-74, during a period as Visiting Scholar at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he devised and wrote ARCHITRAINER, an interactive computer game simulating architect-client dialogues. In spring 1978 he went on a British Council sponsored lecture tour to South America, encouraging him to further broaden his knowledge and critical range. In the following decade he taught at major universities in Canada (1978), the USA (1979-81), Malaysia (1981-82), Saudi Arabia (1982-85), Singapore (1985-86) and Turkey (1988-89). The outcome was a series of new teaching programmes and articles in The Architectural Review and other journals propagating a modern regionalism based upon both local and global sources. In 1989 he returned to the UK to consolidate his experiences and after a short period at the University of Dundee joined the University of Nottingham School of Architecture in 1991. There he established a series of interdisciplinary theory courses and design studios aimed at developing a new model of design education in keeping with advanced collaborative practice. In 1996 these were embodied into a radically new, computer based design studio called the Bio-Tech Architecture Workshop. In 1997 he left Nottingham to live and write in Malta, where he has maintained a home since 1983. He has continued to travel widely and has been sponsored on conferences and lecture tours in the Far East by both the Commonwealth Association of Ar

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