Architecture and patterns for IT service management, resource planning, and governance : service management, resource planning, and governance : making shoes for the cobbler's children

Front Cover
Elsevier, 2011 - Computer network architectures - 439 pages
1 Review
Information technology supports efficient operations, enterprise integration, and seamless value delivery, yet itself is too often inefficient, un-integrated, and of unclear value. This completely rewritten version of the bestselling "Architecture and Patterns for IT Service Management, Resource Planning and Governance" retains the original (and still unique) approach: apply the discipline of enterprise architecture to the business of large scale IT management itself. Author Charles Betz applies his deep practitioner experience to a critical reading of ITIL 2011, COBIT version 4, the CMMI suite, the IT portfolio management literature, and the Agile/Lean IT convergence, and derives a value stream analysis, IT semantic model, and enabling systems architecture (covering current topics such as CMDB/CMS, Service Catalog, and IT Portfolio Management). Using the concept of design patterns, the book then presents dozens of visual models documenting challenging problems in integrating IT management, showing how process, data, and IT management systems must work together to enable IT and its business partners. The edition retains the fundamental discipline of traceable process, data, and system analysis that has made the first edition a favored desk reference for IT process analysts around the world. This best seller is a must read for anyone charged with enterprise architecture, IT planning, or IT governance and management. It features: Lean-oriented process analysis of IT management, carefully distinguished from an IT functional model; Field-tested conceptual information model with definitions and usage scenarios, mapped to both the process and system architectures; and, Integrated architecture for IT management systems. It presents Synthesizes Enterprise Architecture, IT Service Management, and IT Portfolio Management in a practical way.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This is a great book for its intended audience. If you work for a large enterprise and are in an IT group that supports the rest of IT, this is a must-read. I have been following Charles Betz on his erp4it blog for many years and had the pleasure of meeting him last year.
In this book, he lays out a framework for IT that defines 9 IT processes and 4 IT lifecycles. You can get a basic overview of his proposed approach in <a href="http://www.bptrends.com/publicationfiles/10-04-2011-ART-Ongoing%20Confusion%20of%20Process%20and%20Function-Betz-Final.pdf">this BPTrends article</a>. Betz makes a persuasive case that these are the 9 processes performed by IT groups:
• Accept Demand
• Execute Project
• Deliver Release
• Complete Change
• Fulfill Service Request
• Deliver Transactional Service
• Restore Service [aka Resolve Incident]
• Improve Service
• Retire Service
These operate across 4 lifecycles:
• Application Service (computation applied to a business problem, e.g. a payroll
application)
• Infrastructure Service (computation applied to an IT problem, e.g. hosting an application)
• Technology Product (types of assets, e.g. a choice of server make/model or database
vendor/version)
• Asset (tangible investment supporting an IT service, e.g. a specific server or database software
license)
As much value as I find in other frameworks such as ITIL and COBIT, I am convinced that the Betz framework is the best holistic approach to IT that exists today. It deserves a much wider audience than it has received so far. I expect that future industry frameworks will find themselves converging on this solution, even if they don't acknowledge or even recognize it.
In addition, Betz' writing is deep. I found myself taking notes on nearly every page, and he provides clear, thoughtful answers to many vexing questions in IT today. If you're struggling with applying ITIL or COBIT guidance, the answer is almost certainly in this book or in its extensive list of references.
Bottom line: buy, beg, borrow, or steal a copy of this book if you are in ITSM, EA, or GEIT.
 

Contents

IT in a World of Continuous Improvement
1
Architecture Approach
33
Patterns for the IT Processes
151
Patterns for the IT Lifecycles
243
Extended Definitions for the IT Architectural Catalogs
315
Fundamentals of Computingfor the Business Professional
409
Production and Services
411
Index
425
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information