Architecture as Nature: The Transcendentalist Idea of Louis Sullivan

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University of Wisconsin Press, 1981 - Architecture - 232 pages
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Although Louis Sullivan (1856-1924) has long been associated with the American transcendentalist movement of Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman, this is the first book to analyze his transcendetalist thought with the development of his architectural style. It also explores sources of and influences on his thought that have not been considered before. With the help of Narciso G. Menocal's new work, both scholars and students of architectural and art history, as well as American cultural and intellectual history, will gain new insights into Sullivan and his work.

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Contents

THE A UTOBIOGRAPHY OF AN IDEA
3
EXPLORATION AND ASSIMILATION
10
INDIAN SUMMER
78
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

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About the author (1981)

Narciso G. Menocal was, at the time of publication, associate professor in the department of art history at the University of Wisconsin--Madison.

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